Date   
GPS antenna free to a good home

Neil Clayton
 

Steve G (kr02g@...) was first to reply.
Send me an address, Steve and I’ll get it off to you.
Neil


__________________________________________________________


I have a used Dynon GPS-251 GPS antenna plus cabling.
Any takers?

Thanks
Neil


Re: GPS antenna free to a good home

cozygirrrl
 

Never mind, looking for SVGPS2020 model

On Aug 11, 2020, at 10:22 AM, cozygirrrl <cozygirrrl@...> wrote:

If this is the std gps for SkyView we’ll take it

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 11, 2020, at 10:01 AM, Neil Clayton <harvey4@...> wrote:

I have a used Dynon GPS-251 GPS antenna plus cabling.
Any takers?

Thanks
Neil




Re: GPS antenna free to a good home

cozygirrrl
 

If this is the std gps for SkyView we’ll take it

On Aug 11, 2020, at 10:01 AM, Neil Clayton <harvey4@...> wrote:

I have a used Dynon GPS-251 GPS antenna plus cabling.
Any takers?

Thanks
Neil




Re: GPS antenna free to a good home

Brian Strack
 

Hi Neil-

I've got a D10A in my VEZ and could use it if nobody's claimed it yet!

Thanks, 

Brian Strack


On Tue, Aug 11, 2020 at 8:01 AM Neil Clayton <harvey4@...> wrote:
I have a used Dynon GPS-251 GPS antenna plus cabling.
Any takers?

Thanks
Neil





GPS antenna free to a good home

Neil Clayton
 

I have a used Dynon GPS-251 GPS antenna plus cabling.
Any takers?

Thanks
Neil

AUS Velocity

Ryszard Zadow
 

Looking for any Velocity owners in the Austin Tx area...

RZ

Re: Cooling - Marlon

Kevin R. Walsh
 

You can make them continue to expand out and curve upward until the sides reach the width of the cylinder heads, and the roof comes tangent to the front of the cylinder fins:


Generally keep the divergent angles to less than 7 degrees to keep the flow somewhat attached.  Bring the roof to the cylinder front with a large radius.



On Wed, Aug 5, 2020 at 12:55 PM Steve Rothert via groups.io <SWROTHERT=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Saro,
Start at the firewall, measuring the height and width of the inlet to get the starting area.  A rule of thumb that was provided to me, is that the diffuser has to extend aft until the area is about twice that of the inltet at the firewall.  You will have to play with the curves to make the side of the diffuser, just touch the inside of the lower  cowling.  Once I had the rough dimensions, I hotwired some foam to make a mold.  Covered the foam with duct tape and laid up the fiberglass



--
Kevin

Re: Cooling - Marlon

Steve Rothert
 

Saro,
Start at the firewall, measuring the height and width of the inlet to get the starting area.  A rule of thumb that was provided to me, is that the diffuser has to extend aft until the area is about twice that of the inltet at the firewall.  You will have to play with the curves to make the side of the diffuser, just touch the inside of the lower  cowling.  Once I had the rough dimensions, I hotwired some foam to make a mold.  Covered the foam with duct tape and laid up the fiberglass

Re: COZY: For sale or trade: Cozy 3

Ryszard Zadow
 

For someone that seems to have no involvement in RAFE at all, you seem to know more about our organization then we do.

Why not put that energy into something positive...

RyZ

On Aug 5, 2020, at 11:06, kent ashton <kjashton@...> wrote:



On Aug 5, 2020, at 10:17 AM, Ryszard Zadow <ryszardzadow@...> wrote:

< People are _giving_ canard airplanes to Ryzard ... >

1) First off let me correct something that’s very important. They are not “giving” the airplanes to me! They are DONATING to the Rutan Aircraft Flying Experience, an IRS approved 501c3 non-profit. These are not gifts. it’s is not “giving” anything away as it’s a transaction that benefits both parties, much like a selling something is.
Nit-pick my language if you like You are the founder, CEO, Chairman of the Board (and head pilot?) of RAFE. While people are not “giving airplanes to you", they are giving them to the organization you head. 501c3s are public charities. In the case of the David Brown EZ, I talked to Brown’s brother before he talked to RAFE. The Brown’s family inherited the airplane and potential liability was a factor in why they gave it to RAFE. The Kennedy EZ belonged to a widow; “advisors” told her to donate it. The Madsen EZ owner had stopped flying the airplane; I don’t know his motivation. Yeah, they took a tax deduction but that’s what people do when they want to get rid of their junk.

2) <...but they’re not giving away $60-70K EZs >

YES THEY ARE! see below:
Where? You show three airplanes at RAFE. Who has gotten a free $60-70K EZ?.

Most other airplanes in our class are, for sake of this example, $75k. But the LongEzs are all $30k. The market assumption is they can’t possibly be as good an airplane as everything priced at $75k! . Someone looking at a $75k kind of airplane won’t consider something in that low a price range because they want a better quality airplane even though the $30k LongEzz might be a top of the line, award winning airplane. It the SELLER that created that situation.
How do you establish what the “market assumption” is? The only thing that can be determined is that the free market values the EZs less than say, the RVs. I can think of a lot of reasons why that is the case but apparently it IS the case.

End of story.
Ryszard
Actual end of story
-Kent


On Aug 4, 2020, at 09:23, kent ashton <kjashton@...> wrote:
People are _giving_ canard airplanes to Ryzard but they’re not giving away $60-70K EZs (although they may be taking that in a tax deduction.)




Re: COZY: For sale or trade: Cozy 3

kent ashton
 

On Aug 5, 2020, at 10:17 AM, Ryszard Zadow <ryszardzadow@...> wrote:

< People are _giving_ canard airplanes to Ryzard ... >

1) First off let me correct something that’s very important. They are not “giving” the airplanes to me! They are DONATING to the Rutan Aircraft Flying Experience, an IRS approved 501c3 non-profit. These are not gifts. it’s is not “giving” anything away as it’s a transaction that benefits both parties, much like a selling something is.
Nit-pick my language if you like You are the founder, CEO, Chairman of the Board (and head pilot?) of RAFE. While people are not “giving airplanes to you", they are giving them to the organization you head. 501c3s are public charities. In the case of the David Brown EZ, I talked to Brown’s brother before he talked to RAFE. The Brown’s family inherited the airplane and potential liability was a factor in why they gave it to RAFE. The Kennedy EZ belonged to a widow; “advisors” told her to donate it. The Madsen EZ owner had stopped flying the airplane; I don’t know his motivation. Yeah, they took a tax deduction but that’s what people do when they want to get rid of their junk.

2) <...but they’re not giving away $60-70K EZs >

YES THEY ARE! see below:
Where? You show three airplanes at RAFE. Who has gotten a free $60-70K EZ?.

Most other airplanes in our class are, for sake of this example, $75k. But the LongEzs are all $30k. The market assumption is they can’t possibly be as good an airplane as everything priced at $75k! . Someone looking at a $75k kind of airplane won’t consider something in that low a price range because they want a better quality airplane even though the $30k LongEzz might be a top of the line, award winning airplane. It the SELLER that created that situation.
How do you establish what the “market assumption” is? The only thing that can be determined is that the free market values the EZs less than say, the RVs. I can think of a lot of reasons why that is the case but apparently it IS the case.

End of story.
Ryszard
Actual end of story
-Kent


On Aug 4, 2020, at 09:23, kent ashton <kjashton@...> wrote:

People are _giving_ canard airplanes to Ryzard but they’re not giving away $60-70K EZs (although they may be taking that in a tax deduction.)


Re: COZY: For sale or trade: Cozy 3

Bill Allen
 

Ryz makes a good point.

I’ve owned both - I had an IO-360 engined RV6 for a couple of years. The only advantage it has, is that it can land on grass - but most RV owners avoid grass here in the UK if they have a choice, because grass is not grass in the same way that tarmac is tarmac.
Having said that, I’ve rarely seen a ratty looking RV, but seen many ratty looking Ezs. 
Most “aircraft consumers” (ie; not builders) make their decisions based on emotion, and emotion is how it looks. A good paint job, interior and panel will add hugely to value even though it may be the same bag of nails inside.....

My 10c.

Bill Allen

On Tue, 4 Aug 2020 at 03:39, Ryszard Zadow <ryszardzadow@...> wrote:
< Legal liability—think about it:>

If that was the case why are other amateur built experimentals of similar classes getting double or triple the prices I see EZs go for?

Ask David Orr, home builder and retired product liability attorney, how much real liability you have for building your airplane.

This topic has been debated before, long time ago. The search function can help you find all that and when you do you’ll find my explanation of how Dick Ward, tired of seeing the airplanes he was a fan of  being given away single-handedly change their  market value simply by persistently asking people to ask more. It worked, but for some reason in the EZ world there’s a small group of nay-sayers  who do things like attack and disparage anyone who attempts to ask what they really think their airplane is worth. Jamie Hicks comes to mind. He still got $48k for his Varieze despite the barrage of grief he got on this very forum. When Dave Schultz put his LongEz up for sale at $115k you’d thought he was the devil himself! 

I have no idea why some people have to do this. My theory is much like those that "hate the rich". Everyone wants to be rich but if they aren't all they seem to want to do is hate those that are.. Some form of "penis envy "I guess but I wouldn't know about that, never that problem lol!  I'm just a Pilot not a Psychologist. 

Last week I put a a new LongEZ owner through RAFE"s Canard Transition Training Program. He did a great job and I look forward to seeing him around our events with his new Long. He bought Shannon Stewarts LongEZ, a really well built airplane. I won't say what he paid for it but I can tell you  it would make a lot of the critics on here faint. Not quite what Dave Shultz wanted but more than Jamie got. I told him he got a bargain,. An RV of that quality would be close to 100K. So should ours. 

Thank you Terry Bartley for chiming in and supporting what I've been saying for years. Stop giving these airplanes away. 

Whatever you think it might be worth, double it. You can always go down, but it's really hard to go up on price once you put it out there at give away prices. Sure there's a chance you won't get that, but there's a 100% chance you won't get it if you don't ask. 

Caveat Emptor and see y'all at Rough River! 

Ryszard 

 
> On Aug 3, 2020, at 12:38, kent ashton <kjashton@...> wrote:
>
> Legal liability—think about it:

--

Re: COZY: For sale or trade: Cozy 3

Ryszard Zadow
 

< People are _giving_ canard airplanes to Ryzard ... >

1) First off let me correct something that’s very important. They are not “giving” the airplanes to me! They are DONATING to the Rutan Aircraft Flying Experience, an IRS approved 501c3 non-profit. These are not gifts. it’s is not “giving” anything away as it’s a transaction that benefits both parties, much like a selling something is.

2) <...but they’re not giving away $60-70K EZs >

YES THEY ARE! see below:

3)<... (although they may be taking that in a tax deduction.)>

By IRS rules a valuation must reflect the market. A professional Appraiser determines the potential donation value based on their independent survey of the market. RAFE is specifically prohibited by IRS rules to get involved with the valuation of a donation. That is between the Donor and the Appraiser. All we can say is “Thank you”, and that is exactly how it has worked.

You can’t use just the classifieds on Canard.com to claim you’ve done a thorough market analysis. That being said if you go to a run of the mill “Appraiser” most of them know nothing about our airplanes. You dint take a rare jewel to a pawn shop to get it appraised. You have to pick the right one
and I can feel safe to say no one on here is a that kind of qualified professional certified Appraiser, including me.

So I’ll once again post my example of why undervaluing these airplanes is bad and how this works:

Suppose you’re looking for a 10 year old pickup truck and for sake of this example they are all about $10k, but one pops up at $5k. A typical human reaction might be to immediately wonder what’s WRONG with it.

Apply that to our situation. Most other airplanes in our class are, for sake of this example, $75k. But the LongEzs are all $30k. The market assumption is they can’t possibly be as good an airplane as everything priced at $75k! . Someone looking at a $75k kind of airplane won’t consider something in that low a price range because they want a better quality airplane even though the $30k LongEzz might be a top of the line, award winning airplane. It the SELLER that created that situation.

IMHO, These airplanes are Ferrari’s. They should be priced the same. Anything less is giving them away.

If we ALL ask more, we will get more. Follow the lead of Dick Ward and DOUBLE YOUR PRICE. A rising tide lifts all boats. Fire-sales, hardship-sales aside, if one person holds out because they don’t “get it” it screws everyone else.

Stop giving these airplanes away!

End of story.
Ryszard

On Aug 4, 2020, at 09:23, kent ashton <kjashton@...> wrote:

People are _giving_ canard airplanes to Ryzard but they’re not giving away $60-70K EZs (although they may be taking that in a tax deduction.)

Re: Cylinder Baffles - RTV impregnated BID Process?

longezn911gg
 

Gary,
That sounds about right from Kent
I just did this also.
One little trick is to put down a thin layer of RTV on the plastic first with a bondo spreader then the first ply of bid, it’s hard to push the RTV thru the bid, then layer after that. Leave it on the plastic to transfer it in place.

Good luck

Craig Gearhart

On Aug 4, 2020, at 2:22 PM, kent ashton <kjashton@...> wrote:

Try two BID layers. First make posterboard patterns for the wraps. Clean cylinder fins with lacquer thinner. Tape plastic to table, tape one BID to the plastic. Save the second piece of BID. Use pieces about 6X6” or 8X8” because the RTV begins to set up fast. Gunk out RTV as quickly as you can and spread it with an old credit card Apply the second piece of BID, squeegee-in the RTV from below and add more if needed. Quickly cut to size using the patterns and apply to the cylinders. Trim after cure.

Aluminum colored RTV from the home stores works very well.
-Kent

On Aug 4, 2020, at 2:07 PM, alpineracing <alpineracing@...> wrote:
Good Day All,
Years ago I made my engine baffles (specifically the ones on the cylinders, not talking about the ones on the cowls) out of a mixture of Black RTV carefully impregnated into the fiberglass cloth, then stuck carefully to the actual cylinder.
This worked EXTREMELY well and I want to do the same thing on my Velocity XLRG. Lasted over 15 years (before the tragic fire)
Can someone point me to the article (I think it was in the Central States??) that detailed the layup process and numbers of ply’s and cannot remember if used UNI or BID for the cloth type for that project.
Thanks!!
Gary Ernest
Velocity XLRG
ARB, MI
email: alpineracing@...
***********************

Re: Ammeter shunt question

KEN4ZZ
 

Google "Wheatstone bridge" and you'll see the classical method of accurately measuring low resistance devices.

Ken

On 8/4/2020 1:15 PM, Del Schier wrote:
It is a resistor, you need 0.3 ohms. Ammeter shunts usually have the rating stamped on them in Amps and mV.

Note: there are large terminals for the high current wires and small screws for the "sense" leads that need to go to the ammeter. These small sense lead wires need to be fused directly at the shunt as they will vaporize if they short to ground somewhere.

When I installed my Dynon EMS I wasn't sure how to wire the ammeter circuit as my airplane has two alternators and main and emergency busses. It occurred to me and I think Bob Knuckles discussed that you can have the shunt wired to read just the load on a buss or alternator output, so there were four different ways I could wire it. I thought maybe I could add a 2nd shunt and add a switch to watch either system but I just left it in series with the main alternator output.

Del Schier
Cozy IV N197DL
Cannon Creek Airpark 15FL



-----Original Message-----
From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of Neil Clayton
Sent: Tuesday, August 4, 2020 10:33 AM
To: Cozy Group <cozy_builders@...>; canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
Subject: [c-a] Ammeter shunt question

I finally decided to replace the Van’s Aircraft ammeter that I originally installed. I have a UMA 0-60 ammeter (thank you, David Orr) but it needs a shunt.

UMA tech support says “any 60A/50mV shunt will work fine”, so the existing shunt might be OK. How can I tell/test it to see if it meets that “60A/50mV” spec. Is there a standard resistance across it that I can measure?

Thanks
Neil







Re: Cooling - Marlon

Saro Marcarian
 

Steve-

Any specs on that diffuser?

-Saro

Re: Cooling - Marlon

Steve Rothert
 

If you have the NACA scoop lower cowling, then you need to build the "diffuser" (and attach it to the lower firewall) to make it work.

Re: Cooling - Marlon

Marlon Gunderson
 

Kent,
Thanks for the tips!  No need to be sorry for the feedback, this is good news: there might be some big improvements possible in the cylinder baffling itself.
-Marlon

On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 12:44 PM Kent or Jackie Ashton <kjashton@...> wrote:
Marlon, Sorry to say, your baffles look leaky and loose.  At the yellow arrows, air will spill out from under the aluminum wrap as soon as it can and leave the fins.   No cooling after it escapes the fins.   Those wraps should go under the valve tubes to keep them tight against the fins.  At the pink arrows, those look like gaps and holes.    All those cracks and openings should be sealed with RTV.  

 The yellow box area is a good place to apply a fiberglass+RTV baffle.  They can be applied wet to be pretty airtight and trimmed.  Under the yellow oval (under the aluminum ) between the cylinders, you may have an open area with no wrap on the fins.  The air coming up between the fins will pass through the empty space between the cylinders and only be forced through the fins in the small area where the alumimum presses against the fins.

These comments (below) are in reference to Kurt Wegge's baffles on his engine. He provided this pic to show me how I could improve mine. 
Below, the black baffles (yellow oval) have many gaps that open up when the cowl rests on them and probably leak plenum air.   I suggest installing them with overlaps.   At the sides (yellow oval) you may have air leaks between the tops of the red baffles and the cylinder.    Or the plenum pressure presses the red baffles inboard and they leak air.  Normally those side baffles are left rather tall and made to bend outboard and create a seal to the cowl.  

Yellow arrows point to big gaps under the cylinder wraps.   Under the pink oval, it appears you have poor sealing around the exhaust piples

Re: Cooling - Marlon

Del Schier
 

I haven’t been following this thread but I see the picture of the deflectors in the bottom cowl.  I made deflectors for my bottom cowl to balance out the cylinders, as the rear ones were running much colder.  It was a lot of trial and error work but I got them much better.  I used this technique to fix the problem as another Cozy builder did his that way.

 

What I wonder is could I have just partially blocked the space between the baffles wrapped around the cylinders and gotten the same results? That would have been MUCH easier!

 

Del Schier

Cozy IV N197DL

Cannon Creek Airpark 15FL

 

 

 

From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Holliston
Sent: Tuesday, August 4, 2020 11:38 AM
To: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
Subject: Re: [c-a] Cooling - Marlon

 

Here's what I did, make dedicated tunnels to replace the ramps. The cooling was acceptable with the ramps, better with the tunnels. This is cooling a 360. All four tops exits have the same sq. in. I did this when I built a new 7 pound lower cowl to replace my 15 pounder using the old cowl as a plug for the mold. Also, the total sq. in. of exits are slightly greater than the entrances to slow down the exit air somewhat. 

 

On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 6:55 AM kent ashton <kjashton@...> wrote:

 

Begin forwarded message:

 

 

I've got no pictures and little information relevant to the oil leak; just that a little oil that gathers at the lip of the NACA intake scoop after a day of post flight kneeling.

 

Seems like people have good success finding those leaks by washing the engine, using some oil-dye from the auto stores, run it a bit and look around with a UV light.

 

It sounds like you have the cooling fixed except for #4.  Maybe you have an intake leak on #4 that is causing lean running.   You might show a picture of the baffles around #4.

 

It appears that the upper-cowl exits you added have given you the pressure differential you need but for a general check on cooling flow through the cylinders, I suggest making some piccolo tubes paired with a water or digital manometer and measure the pressure differential just above and below the cylinders.    Lycoming says you need about 5.5” of differential to get adequate cooling.  See various discussions here  https://www.canardzone.com/search/?q=piccolo&quick=1&type=forums_topic&item=18661

 

Curious about the ramps you show below.  I am guessing you widened the initial ramps you had but built them off the floor of the cowl?  Does the airflow enter duct and get ducted up to #3 and #4?  I that would be more restrictive than a plain curved ramp pointing up to point at #4.  The duct(?) for #4 looks smaller and air will not want to pass through a duct if it can go around the duct. I think you were on the right track to widen the ramps but question how you did it.   I would like to see more pics of that setup from the inlet direction. Also  I don’t quite understand what the other small baffles do.  

 

5.) Having seen this on a number of canards and hearing some swear by it, I added cooling air exit vents to the cowling top.  I was saving this mod until all else had failed since it seemed draconian, but I was out of ideas.

This modification provided the single greatest positive impact on my cooling of anything I tried to date.  With this, I now have 3 cylinders that have perfectly acceptable temps even on warm days.  But cyl #4 will still keep climbing above 435 and won't stabilize until I reduce power on a warm day.

 

Yeah, I have found exits like this to be very helpful (on a downdraft engine).  https://www.canardzone.com/forums/topic/18661-kents-long-ez-project/?do=findComment&comment=66677   Also the normal cowl exit you showed looked rather constricted.  Frankly, I think your exit square inches are not as big as your inlet square inches.  I do not have much expectation in air exiting around the prop hub.  My theory is that there is too much obstruction at the hub and the flow exits mostly at the sides of the cowl opening (which looked a bit restricted in your picture) and at your upper cowl exits, which are still rather small compared to inlet area.  I would speculate that maybe the sheet metal you added (below) is causing turbulence and restriction that is not helping the air from #4 to smoothly enter the starboard exit.   Hard to say


6.) I added a cooling exit air diverter that gives cyl#4 greater access to the cooling exit vent. This was an easier change to do than moving the exit vent further forward to primarily cool the front cylinder and was really more of a test to see if maybe I should move the vent forward.



Much to my disappointment this didn't seem to have much affect on cooling for cyl#4.

 

Those metal edges and corners (above) would not appear to promote good organized flow going into the exit.   

  
At which point I started spending way too much time looking at Bonanza's on Barnstormers.

 

Noooooo!    :-)


My current thoughts are: 
1-maybe I have thermocouple wires for cylinders 3 and 4 swapped to the EMS so it's really cyl#3 that I need to work on, and that improvement for cyl#4 is reported on cyl#3 which is already good enough that I might not notice much improvement there.  This should be easy enough to test and will be what I look at next.

 

Good idea.


2- I can increase the cooling ramp width for cylinder 4.

 

Yup, the ramps look a little narrow to me (see markup below).  There is usually no problem getting flow back to #1 & 2.  The incoming air is heavy and wants to pile up against the aft baffles.  The problem is to grab some of it and make it go up to #3 & 4


3- Push comes to shove I can do what Vance did and add an adjustable inlet lip that can deflect downward to scoop more air when greater cooling is required.

 

I don’t think that’s necessary.  I think I would try the piccolo measurement and bigger ramps.  Look for an intake leak too.  Good luck   -Kent

 


 

--

Re: Cylinder Baffles - RTV impregnated BID Process?

kent ashton
 

Try two BID layers. First make posterboard patterns for the wraps. Clean cylinder fins with lacquer thinner. Tape plastic to table, tape one BID to the plastic. Save the second piece of BID. Use pieces about 6X6” or 8X8” because the RTV begins to set up fast. Gunk out RTV as quickly as you can and spread it with an old credit card Apply the second piece of BID, squeegee-in the RTV from below and add more if needed. Quickly cut to size using the patterns and apply to the cylinders. Trim after cure.

Aluminum colored RTV from the home stores works very well.
-Kent

On Aug 4, 2020, at 2:07 PM, alpineracing <alpineracing@...> wrote:

Good Day All,

Years ago I made my engine baffles (specifically the ones on the cylinders, not talking about the ones on the cowls) out of a mixture of Black RTV carefully impregnated into the fiberglass cloth, then stuck carefully to the actual cylinder.

This worked EXTREMELY well and I want to do the same thing on my Velocity XLRG. Lasted over 15 years (before the tragic fire)

Can someone point me to the article (I think it was in the Central States??) that detailed the layup process and numbers of ply’s and cannot remember if used UNI or BID for the cloth type for that project.

Thanks!!


Gary Ernest
Velocity XLRG
ARB, MI
email: alpineracing@...
***********************

Re: Ammeter shunt question

Del Schier
 

It is a resistor, you need 0.3 ohms. Ammeter shunts usually have the rating stamped on them in Amps and mV.

Note: there are large terminals for the high current wires and small screws for the "sense" leads that need to go to the ammeter. These small sense lead wires need to be fused directly at the shunt as they will vaporize if they short to ground somewhere.

When I installed my Dynon EMS I wasn't sure how to wire the ammeter circuit as my airplane has two alternators and main and emergency busses. It occurred to me and I think Bob Knuckles discussed that you can have the shunt wired to read just the load on a buss or alternator output, so there were four different ways I could wire it. I thought maybe I could add a 2nd shunt and add a switch to watch either system but I just left it in series with the main alternator output.

Del Schier
Cozy IV N197DL
Cannon Creek Airpark 15FL

-----Original Message-----
From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of Neil Clayton
Sent: Tuesday, August 4, 2020 10:33 AM
To: Cozy Group <cozy_builders@...>; canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
Subject: [c-a] Ammeter shunt question

I finally decided to replace the Van’s Aircraft ammeter that I originally installed. I have a UMA 0-60 ammeter (thank you, David Orr) but it needs a shunt.

UMA tech support says “any 60A/50mV shunt will work fine”, so the existing shunt might be OK. How can I tell/test it to see if it meets that “60A/50mV” spec. Is there a standard resistance across it that I can measure?

Thanks
Neil