Date   

Re: Cozy: High speed taxi test

Phil Kriley
 

Del, it takes two people to remove my top cowl because of the risk of damaging my very expensive 3-blade prop.

I will probably replace my Phillips screws with Torx, though.  Seems like a good idea.

Phil

On Feb 8, 2020, at 11:23 AM, Del Schier <cozypilot@...> wrote:

I also understand not wanting to take the cowls off and on.  It used to take me longer to do this than removing the canard to work on the panel.

 

I don’t know why It would take two people to remove or install them.  It helps if you put the nose up a bit to do the top cowl and with the nose down sit on a low roll around shop chair for the bottom.

 

The 76 cowl screws are a nightmare and if I built my airplane I would have used ¼ turns.  A BIG improvement is to get rid of the phillips head screws and switch to Torx, this makes the job much easier.

 

Torx screws are probably the best improvement I have made to my Cozy! You will never have to buy another Phillips screwdriver tip.  You will still have to be careful with a screw gun not to keep turning if the screws are galling.

 

You can get the screws at http://www.microfasteners.com/home.php?cat=620

 

 

Del Schier

Cozy IV N197DL

Cannon Creek Airpark 15FL

 

 

 

From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of aviationeyes
Sent: Thursday, February 6, 2020 2:07 PM
To: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
Subject: Re: [c-a] Cozy: High speed taxi test

 

Man oh man, I can understand the temptation of not dealing with the cowls. Taking cowls on and off my LongEz is a tedious 30+ minute round trip. It doesn't help that the oil cooler and crank case breather tube are mounted to the bottom cowl. Done it hundreds of times and just no fun. Every time I do it I think of that Vari-Eze (Bill James?) that uses one wire pin to retain his cowls. I've watched with jealosy how at Oshkosh he demonstrates at will how easily his cowlings go off and back on.

 

--Jose

 

 

On Thu, Feb 6, 2020, at 1:44 PM, Ron Springer wrote:

I should have more clearly said there is no risk of flying if you follow my method and have the stick full forward.

 

Now, why do it? Well, I was making parametric changes to the engine and wanted to collect engine data during a full throttle takeoff run. I did not want to cowl a de-cowl it a bunch of times.

...

 


Re: Cozy: High speed taxi test

Del Schier
 

I also understand not wanting to take the cowls off and on.  It used to take me longer to do this than removing the canard to work on the panel.

 

I don’t know why It would take two people to remove or install them.  It helps if you put the nose up a bit to do the top cowl and with the nose down sit on a low roll around shop chair for the bottom.

 

The 76 cowl screws are a nightmare and if I built my airplane I would have used ¼ turns.  A BIG improvement is to get rid of the phillips head screws and switch to Torx, this makes the job much easier.

 

Torx screws are probably the best improvement I have made to my Cozy! You will never have to buy another Phillips screwdriver tip.  You will still have to be careful with a screw gun not to keep turning if the screws are galling.

 

You can get the screws at http://www.microfasteners.com/home.php?cat=620

 

 

Del Schier

Cozy IV N197DL

Cannon Creek Airpark 15FL

 

 

 

From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of aviationeyes
Sent: Thursday, February 6, 2020 2:07 PM
To: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
Subject: Re: [c-a] Cozy: High speed taxi test

 

Man oh man, I can understand the temptation of not dealing with the cowls. Taking cowls on and off my LongEz is a tedious 30+ minute round trip. It doesn't help that the oil cooler and crank case breather tube are mounted to the bottom cowl. Done it hundreds of times and just no fun. Every time I do it I think of that Vari-Eze (Bill James?) that uses one wire pin to retain his cowls. I've watched with jealosy how at Oshkosh he demonstrates at will how easily his cowlings go off and back on.

 

--Jose

 

 

On Thu, Feb 6, 2020, at 1:44 PM, Ron Springer wrote:

I should have more clearly said there is no risk of flying if you follow my method and have the stick full forward.

 

Now, why do it? Well, I was making parametric changes to the engine and wanted to collect engine data during a full throttle takeoff run. I did not want to cowl a de-cowl it a bunch of times.

...

 


Re: Canopy Plastic Cleaner

Dale Martin
 

Lemon Pledge also works for leading edges and props.



Dale
For Contact info - See Website
http://www.long-ez.com
=====================>


On Fri, Feb 7, 2020 at 3:45 PM Neil K <neil.kruiswyk@...> wrote:
Ditto on lemon Pledge. Worked dandy for the last 12 years on EZ and all the planes and Goldwings before that. 

Neil K.

On Feb 7, 2020, at 5:19 PM, Bob Holliston <bob.holliston@...> wrote:


Been using Lemon Pledge for 27 years, no problems. Works for taking bugs off the wings too, but I just use a hand towel soaked and wrung out with warm water. The hanger next door has a hose lying on the ground in the sun full of (free) warm water. With the warm, wet towel it never takes more than three minutes to get all the bugs off if I do it immediately after landing. 

On Fri, Feb 7, 2020 at 2:50 PM KEN4ZZ via Groups.Io <ken4zz=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I use bottled drinking water and a clean microfiber cloth.?? If you get to the bugs while they're 'fresh', it's usually all you need.?? Save your preferred super stuff for problem spots.

Ken

On 2/7/2020 3:35 PM, Keith Spreuer wrote:
I've been using Plexus aerosol cleaner fort a while and it is good but at $22.50 for a 13 oz can pretty expensive. There must be a cheaper alternative that is still good for the plastic. What do you guys use?

Keith



--


Re: Hartwell Latch H5000-2

Dale Martin
 


On Fri, Feb 7, 2020 at 7:37 PM Dale Martin <niceez@...> wrote:
Greg,

If your going to use the latch for an oil door you really need one that does not leak "IF" you are using updraft cooling. 
Suggest you look at this one for $9.00 more.  It it much nicer and it seals if installed correctly.


Dale
For Contact info - See Website
http://www.long-ez.com
=====================>


On Fri, Feb 7, 2020 at 1:01 PM Greg Norman <gnorm76@...> wrote:
Pretty good deal

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Wicks Aircraft Supply <ericc@...>
Date: Thu, Feb 6, 2020 at 1:44 PM
Subject: Hartwell Latch H5000-2
To: <gnorm76@...>


  
LOGOLargeBlackYellow


H5000-2 HARTWELL LATCH
$40.00/EA

The Hartwell is a unique spring loaded, trigger action latch for cowling and access doors. Made of corrosion resistant steel. Rivet or spot weld to structure. Mounting plate 2-1/8" x 1-3/8" Latch extends 1/2" beyond plate.
 
***THESE ARE SURPLUS***
NO CERTS AVAILABLE

FREE SHIPPING
ON WEB PURCHASE


     
            800-221-9425    618-654-7447
Wicks Aircraft Supply, 410 Pine Street, Highland, IL 62249
Sent by ericc@... in collaboration with
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!


Re: Hartwell Latch H5000-2

Dale Martin
 

Greg,

If your going to use the latch for an oil door you really need one that does not leak "IF" you are using updraft cooling. 
Suggest you look at this one for $9.00 more.  It it much nicer and it seals if installed correctly.


Dale
For Contact info - See Website
http://www.long-ez.com
=====================>


On Fri, Feb 7, 2020 at 1:01 PM Greg Norman <gnorm76@...> wrote:
Pretty good deal

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Wicks Aircraft Supply <ericc@...>
Date: Thu, Feb 6, 2020 at 1:44 PM
Subject: Hartwell Latch H5000-2
To: <gnorm76@...>


  
LOGOLargeBlackYellow


H5000-2 HARTWELL LATCH
$40.00/EA

The Hartwell is a unique spring loaded, trigger action latch for cowling and access doors. Made of corrosion resistant steel. Rivet or spot weld to structure. Mounting plate 2-1/8" x 1-3/8" Latch extends 1/2" beyond plate.
 
***THESE ARE SURPLUS***
NO CERTS AVAILABLE

FREE SHIPPING
ON WEB PURCHASE


     
            800-221-9425    618-654-7447
Wicks Aircraft Supply, 410 Pine Street, Highland, IL 62249
Sent by ericc@... in collaboration with
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!


Re: COZY: Canopy Plastic Cleaner

Ryszard Zadow
 

KPC Speed Clean is the official canopy cleaner of the Rutan Aircraft Flying Experience.  


On Feb 7, 2020, at 16:46, aviationeyes <skyeyecorp@...> wrote:


I've used Novus, Plexus and several others. Convenient, I guess. Mild soap and lots of water works wonders. However, Pledge works very well and I believe even recommended by some canopy makers. 
--Jose


On Fri, Feb 7, 2020, at 5:22 PM, Andrew Anunson via Groups.Io wrote:
My canopy manufacturer told me to use ONLY Novus products. The cleaner/polish is $16 for 64 oz at Spruce.

Andrew Anunson

Sent from a generic phonograph

On Feb 7, 2020, at 4:35 PM, Keith Spreuer <kspreuer@...> wrote:

I've been using Plexus aerosol cleaner fort a while and it is good but at $22.50 for a 13 oz can pretty expensive. There must be a cheaper alternative that is still good for the plastic. What do you guys use?

Keith


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Re: Canopy Plastic Cleaner

Neil K
 

Ditto on lemon Pledge. Worked dandy for the last 12 years on EZ and all the planes and Goldwings before that. 

Neil K.

On Feb 7, 2020, at 5:19 PM, Bob Holliston <bob.holliston@...> wrote:


Been using Lemon Pledge for 27 years, no problems. Works for taking bugs off the wings too, but I just use a hand towel soaked and wrung out with warm water. The hanger next door has a hose lying on the ground in the sun full of (free) warm water. With the warm, wet towel it never takes more than three minutes to get all the bugs off if I do it immediately after landing. 

On Fri, Feb 7, 2020 at 2:50 PM KEN4ZZ via Groups.Io <ken4zz=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I use bottled drinking water and a clean microfiber cloth.?? If you get to the bugs while they're 'fresh', it's usually all you need.?? Save your preferred super stuff for problem spots.

Ken

On 2/7/2020 3:35 PM, Keith Spreuer wrote:
I've been using Plexus aerosol cleaner fort a while and it is good but at $22.50 for a 13 oz can pretty expensive. There must be a cheaper alternative that is still good for the plastic. What do you guys use?

Keith



--


Re: Canopy Plastic Cleaner

Bob Holliston
 

Been using Lemon Pledge for 27 years, no problems. Works for taking bugs off the wings too, but I just use a hand towel soaked and wrung out with warm water. The hanger next door has a hose lying on the ground in the sun full of (free) warm water. With the warm, wet towel it never takes more than three minutes to get all the bugs off if I do it immediately after landing. 


On Fri, Feb 7, 2020 at 2:50 PM KEN4ZZ via Groups.Io <ken4zz=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I use bottled drinking water and a clean microfiber cloth.?? If you get to the bugs while they're 'fresh', it's usually all you need.?? Save your preferred super stuff for problem spots.

Ken

On 2/7/2020 3:35 PM, Keith Spreuer wrote:
I've been using Plexus aerosol cleaner fort a while and it is good but at $22.50 for a 13 oz can pretty expensive. There must be a cheaper alternative that is still good for the plastic. What do you guys use?

Keith



--


Re: Canopy Plastic Cleaner

Jim Rodrian
 

Klear-To-Land is the product I use.  (https://store.dwdavies.com/content/klear-land) Cost is $5 - $6 per can.

 

Jim

Defiant N403R

 

From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of Keith Spreuer
Sent: Friday, February 07, 2020 3:35 PM
To: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io; Cozy Builders <cozy_builders@...>
Subject: [c-a] Canopy Plastic Cleaner

 

I've been using Plexus aerosol cleaner fort a while and it is good but at $22.50 for a 13 oz can pretty expensive. There must be a cheaper alternative that is still good for the plastic. What do you guys use?

 

Keith


Re: Canopy Plastic Cleaner

KEN4ZZ
 

I use bottled drinking water and a clean microfiber cloth.?? If you get to the bugs while they're 'fresh', it's usually all you need.?? Save your preferred super stuff for problem spots.

Ken

On 2/7/2020 3:35 PM, Keith Spreuer wrote:
I've been using Plexus aerosol cleaner fort a while and it is good but at $22.50 for a 13 oz can pretty expensive. There must be a cheaper alternative that is still good for the plastic. What do you guys use?

Keith


Re: COZY: Canopy Plastic Cleaner

aviationeyes
 

I've used Novus, Plexus and several others. Convenient, I guess. Mild soap and lots of water works wonders. However, Pledge works very well and I believe even recommended by some canopy makers. 
--Jose


On Fri, Feb 7, 2020, at 5:22 PM, Andrew Anunson via Groups.Io wrote:
My canopy manufacturer told me to use ONLY Novus products. The cleaner/polish is $16 for 64 oz at Spruce.

Andrew Anunson

Sent from a generic phonograph

On Feb 7, 2020, at 4:35 PM, Keith Spreuer <kspreuer@...> wrote:

I've been using Plexus aerosol cleaner fort a while and it is good but at $22.50 for a 13 oz can pretty expensive. There must be a cheaper alternative that is still good for the plastic. What do you guys use?

Keith


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You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "COZY Builders Mailing List" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to cozy_builders+unsubscribe@....

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  skyeyecorp@...



Re: COZY: Canopy Plastic Cleaner

Andrew Anunson
 

My canopy manufacturer told me to use ONLY Novus products. The cleaner/polish is $16 for 64 oz at Spruce.

Andrew Anunson

Sent from a generic phonograph

On Feb 7, 2020, at 4:35 PM, Keith Spreuer <kspreuer@...> wrote:


I've been using Plexus aerosol cleaner fort a while and it is good but at $22.50 for a 13 oz can pretty expensive. There must be a cheaper alternative that is still good for the plastic. What do you guys use?

Keith

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To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to cozy_builders+unsubscribe@....
To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/cozy_builders/CAC8ZdynLmWhhhMg-ojPGkO5JKSsxKz484WhFAEeCW_EgoFYieA%40mail.gmail.com.


Re: Cozy: High speed taxi test

jack hohner
 

I recall an old Burt Rutan training video where he has you going down the runway and you lift the nose and practice holding it on the horizon.  And do this several times before first flight.

Jack Hohner
LongEZ 
Spokane, WA


Canopy Plastic Cleaner

Keith Spreuer
 

I've been using Plexus aerosol cleaner fort a while and it is good but at $22.50 for a 13 oz can pretty expensive. There must be a cheaper alternative that is still good for the plastic. What do you guys use?

Keith


Hartwell Latch H5000-2

Greg Norman
 

Pretty good deal

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Wicks Aircraft Supply <ericc@...>
Date: Thu, Feb 6, 2020 at 1:44 PM
Subject: Hartwell Latch H5000-2
To: <gnorm76@...>


  
LOGOLargeBlackYellow


H5000-2 HARTWELL LATCH
$40.00/EA

The Hartwell is a unique spring loaded, trigger action latch for cowling and access doors. Made of corrosion resistant steel. Rivet or spot weld to structure. Mounting plate 2-1/8" x 1-3/8" Latch extends 1/2" beyond plate.
 
***THESE ARE SURPLUS***
NO CERTS AVAILABLE

FREE SHIPPING
ON WEB PURCHASE


     
            800-221-9425    618-654-7447
Wicks Aircraft Supply, 410 Pine Street, Highland, IL 62249
Sent by ericc@... in collaboration with
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!


Re: Santa Monica Canard

Doug Kan
 

Dave R is still there plus there is another beautiful Berkut that is very fast with a 330hp IO540 from Lycon with a dual EFII system.


Re: Cozy: High speed taxi test

Curtis Martin
 

Hey Phil,
If the object is to break in new Cleveland pads the recommended taxi speed is only 30-35 KTS for metallic pads.
With those speeds no cowl necessary imho.
If I was to get anywhere near stall speeds for any reason, brakes not being one, I’d cowl up.
Hope this is a bit more objective :-)!
Curtis Martin
Retired Firefighter
Partner/builder of Long-ez N12LZ

On Feb 6, 2020, at 8:01 PM, Phil Kriley via Groups.Io <greilich=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

Good Lord folks, if you can’t keep your plane from flying what are you doing in the plane? 🤪 If a gust of wind might make you airborne, then taxi slower or pick a calmer day. If getting briefly airborne is going to cause you to run off the runway, don’t taxi so fast or pick a longer runway.

My question was NOT can I FLY with the top cowling off, but can I fast taxi so I can bed in my new brakes. If a sudden gust caused me to rotate, I would chop the throttle - which I was about to do anyway - and set the nose back down and apply the brakes - which I also was about to do anyway.

And this is not something you can safely do on the taxiways I have access to. I want to test full throttle, accelerate to 60, chop the throttle and apply the brakes. No way in hell am I accidentally going to become airborne. I can do this with 3000 feet of runway left.

Phil Kriley
Almost got 93CF back in the air
Soon returning to building 87PR


On Feb 6, 2020, at 5:50 PM, KEN4ZZ via Groups.Io <ken4zz=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I've been trying to not to be pulled into the slipstream of this let's call it "thought exercise", yet here I am.?? My personal rule of thumb is:?? If I plan on the airplane moving any faster than a fit person can run, the plane (and pilot) must be ready to fly. Period.

It's just way, way too easy for our canard aircraft to accidentally become airborne when the plane is near flying - not rotation, but flying - speed.???? All it takes is something as simple as an errant gust, a nose wheel bounce, or one or two heartbeats of distraction caused by some other unexpected event.

So let's think this through:?? There you are, unexpectedly 15 or 20 feet in the air w/ a very high pitch attitude and rapidly decaying already low airspeed.?? Do you

A) do nothing and perform an inadvertent multi G drop test of your landing gear?
B) add just enough power to soften the splat but run off the end of the runway at 30 or 40 knots?
??or
C)?? cob the power to it and take it around the pattern?

My sense is that most pilots would choose "C" and hope for the best.?? To your great credit, you make it clear you don't know what's going to happen.?? Ask yourself what you'd do if only half way to pattern altitude on cross wind you see all 4 CHTs way past red line and your engine starts losing power due to detonation. Suddenly it might seem like having chosen to run off the end of the runway could have been the better choice.

I truly get where you're coming from re cowlings that are a PITA to remove / replace.?? That said, it's many orders of magnitude less work than rebuilding a landing gear or replacing a fried engine.

Just my $0.02.

Ken






Re: Cozy: High speed taxi test

Phil Kriley
 

Good Lord folks, if you can’t keep your plane from flying what are you doing in the plane? 🤪 If a gust of wind might make you airborne, then taxi slower or pick a calmer day. If getting briefly airborne is going to cause you to run off the runway, don’t taxi so fast or pick a longer runway.

My question was NOT can I FLY with the top cowling off, but can I fast taxi so I can bed in my new brakes. If a sudden gust caused me to rotate, I would chop the throttle - which I was about to do anyway - and set the nose back down and apply the brakes - which I also was about to do anyway.

And this is not something you can safely do on the taxiways I have access to. I want to test full throttle, accelerate to 60, chop the throttle and apply the brakes. No way in hell am I accidentally going to become airborne. I can do this with 3000 feet of runway left.

Phil Kriley
Almost got 93CF back in the air
Soon returning to building 87PR

On Feb 6, 2020, at 5:50 PM, KEN4ZZ via Groups.Io <ken4zz=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I've been trying to not to be pulled into the slipstream of this let's call it "thought exercise", yet here I am.?? My personal rule of thumb is:?? If I plan on the airplane moving any faster than a fit person can run, the plane (and pilot) must be ready to fly. Period.

It's just way, way too easy for our canard aircraft to accidentally become airborne when the plane is near flying - not rotation, but flying - speed.???? All it takes is something as simple as an errant gust, a nose wheel bounce, or one or two heartbeats of distraction caused by some other unexpected event.

So let's think this through:?? There you are, unexpectedly 15 or 20 feet in the air w/ a very high pitch attitude and rapidly decaying already low airspeed.?? Do you

A) do nothing and perform an inadvertent multi G drop test of your landing gear?
B) add just enough power to soften the splat but run off the end of the runway at 30 or 40 knots?
??or
C)?? cob the power to it and take it around the pattern?

My sense is that most pilots would choose "C" and hope for the best.?? To your great credit, you make it clear you don't know what's going to happen.?? Ask yourself what you'd do if only half way to pattern altitude on cross wind you see all 4 CHTs way past red line and your engine starts losing power due to detonation. Suddenly it might seem like having chosen to run off the end of the runway could have been the better choice.

I truly get where you're coming from re cowlings that are a PITA to remove / replace.?? That said, it's many orders of magnitude less work than rebuilding a landing gear or replacing a fried engine.

Just my $0.02.

Ken




Re: Cozy: High speed taxi test

KEN4ZZ
 

I've been trying to not to be pulled into the slipstream of this let's call it "thought exercise", yet here I am.?? My personal rule of thumb is:?? If I plan on the airplane moving any faster than a fit person can run, the plane (and pilot) must be ready to fly. Period.

It's just way, way too easy for our canard aircraft to accidentally become airborne when the plane is near flying - not rotation, but flying - speed.???? All it takes is something as simple as an errant gust, a nose wheel bounce, or one or two heartbeats of distraction caused by some other unexpected event.

So let's think this through:?? There you are, unexpectedly 15 or 20 feet in the air w/ a very high pitch attitude and rapidly decaying already low airspeed.?? Do you

A) do nothing and perform an inadvertent multi G drop test of your landing gear?
B) add just enough power to soften the splat but run off the end of the runway at 30 or 40 knots?
??or
C)?? cob the power to it and take it around the pattern?

My sense is that most pilots would choose "C" and hope for the best.?? To your great credit, you make it clear you don't know what's going to happen.?? Ask yourself what you'd do if only half way to pattern altitude on cross wind you see all 4 CHTs way past red line and your engine starts losing power due to detonation. Suddenly it might seem like having chosen to run off the end of the runway could have been the better choice.

I truly get where you're coming from re cowlings that are a PITA to remove / replace.?? That said, it's many orders of magnitude less work than rebuilding a landing gear or replacing a fried engine.

Just my $0.02.

Ken


Re: Cozy: High speed taxi test

Bulent Aliev
 


The air has to be forced between the fins to cool the cylinders.  


On Thu, Feb 6, 2020 at 4:21 PM Keith Spreuer <kspreuer@...> wrote:
Hmm? You can have all the low pressure you want above the engine but it won't help with those huge open areas on both side letting any high pressure air bypass

On Thu, Feb 6, 2020 at 12:53 PM David A Froble <davef@...> wrote:
Well, Ok, not saying you are wrong.  Again, I don't know.

But that written, One might guess that cooling would be improved.  Low
pressure on top of aircraft might pull more air through engine.

I've read in the past that some have cut holes in top cowl to let air out.

I'm not advocating anything.  I ask questions to learn.


On 2/6/2020 3:16 PM, Keith Spreuer wrote:
> Flying without the top cowl would probably be a non issue
> aerodynamically but cooling would be awful and likely damage the engine.
> IMHO
> Keith
>
> On Thu, Feb 6, 2020 at 11:28 AM David A Froble <davef@...
> <mailto:davef@...>> wrote:
>
>
>
>     On 2/6/2020 1:37 PM, Ron Springer wrote:
>     > Because there is no risk
>
>     The only question I have is, does flying without cowl present any
>     problems?  I have no idea.  I'd think that at slow speed there would
>     not
>     be any problems, but, as I wrote, I don't really know.
>
>     It is true that one just might become airborne, even though the intent
>     is high speed taxi.
>
>     --
>     David Froble                       Tel: 724-529-0450
>     Dave Froble Enterprises, Inc.      E-Mail: davef@...
>     <mailto:davef@...>
>     DFE Ultralights, Inc.
>     170 Grimplin Road
>     Vanderbilt, PA  15486
>
>
>
>

--
David Froble                       Tel: 724-529-0450
Dave Froble Enterprises, Inc.      E-Mail: davef@...
DFE Ultralights, Inc.
170 Grimplin Road
Vanderbilt, PA  15486



--
Bulent Aliev
Enginegear
ph +1 954.557.1019
fax +1 386.957.4473
Bulent@...
www.enginegearonline.com

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