Date   

Canard Calendar - July

Erlend Moen
 

The July Canard Desktop Calendar is ready for download.

As always: Thanks a lot for the many beautiful pictures I have received so far. I’m always looking for new pictures, if you have pictures to share, please send them over to me. I need as large resolution as possible. My bandwidth is no problem, so don’t be afraid to send over large images!

 

Safe flying (and building)!

 

Here is the link: http://ljosnes.no/cozy/canard-calendar

 

PS: If the new calendar doesn’t show up, it’s probably because the website is cached in your web browser. Try to hit F5 to reload the page if this happens.

--

Erlend Moen

Cozy #1556 – chapter 20


Re: Valve/Rocker arm setting

Harley Dixon
 

Thanks Steve...already checked mine.  Lists them as .007 to .009. So .010 is a no go, and .008 is a go IMHO.

Harley


On 6/30/2020 1:36 PM, Steve Beert wrote:
Harley look at your Data Plate My O235 L2C Data plate says .010 but like Craig’s states look in the engine manual also. 

Steve Beert


On Jun 30, 2020, at 12:04 PM, longezn911gg via groups.io <longezn911gg@...> wrote:

 Harley,
You want to pre-load #2 and #4 then start with #1 at TDC set it to .008” +/-.001 then continue in the firing order. After you have completed it go around once more re-checking with the feeler gauge. There is a you tube video on the 0-290, which is the same. Always refer to the lycoming manual.

Good luck 

Craig Gearhart


On Jun 30, 2020, at 12:09 PM, Harley Dixon <harley@...> wrote:


What's the accepted way to adjust the valve lash?  Lycoming instructions say to set the cylinder at TDC, then check or adjust the rocker arm/push rod gap (solid lifters...it's an O-235 C) but wouldn't it be easier to rotate the prop until the intake valve is approaching fully open then set the exhaust valve rocker arm gap, and vice versa for the exhaust valve settings? That's the way I used to do it for my cars before hydraulic lifters. Looking around the internet, I don't see any mention of doing it this way on solid lifter aircraft engines.

Harley
Long EZ N28EZ

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Valve/Rocker arm setting

Harley Dixon
 

Thanks. That what what I was going to do (using the Lycoming Service Instruction #1068A), but I was hoping that there would be a bit shorter and simpler way!  I have nothing but time now anyway, so no problem!

Harley


On 6/30/2020 1:04 PM, longezn911gg via groups.io wrote:
Harley,
You want to pre-load #2 and #4 then start with #1 at TDC set it to .008” +/-.001 then continue in the firing order. After you have completed it go around once more re-checking with the feeler gauge. There is a you tube video on the 0-290, which is the same. Always refer to the lycoming manual.

Good luck 

Craig Gearhart


On Jun 30, 2020, at 12:09 PM, Harley Dixon <harley@...> wrote:


What's the accepted way to adjust the valve lash?  Lycoming instructions say to set the cylinder at TDC, then check or adjust the rocker arm/push rod gap (solid lifters...it's an O-235 C) but wouldn't it be easier to rotate the prop until the intake valve is approaching fully open then set the exhaust valve rocker arm gap, and vice versa for the exhaust valve settings? That's the way I used to do it for my cars before hydraulic lifters. Looking around the internet, I don't see any mention of doing it this way on solid lifter aircraft engines.

Harley
Long EZ N28EZ

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Valve/Rocker arm setting

Steve Beert
 

Harley look at your Data Plate My O235 L2C Data plate says .010 but like Craig’s states look in the engine manual also. 

Steve Beert


On Jun 30, 2020, at 12:04 PM, longezn911gg via groups.io <longezn911gg@...> wrote:

Harley,
You want to pre-load #2 and #4 then start with #1 at TDC set it to .008” +/-.001 then continue in the firing order. After you have completed it go around once more re-checking with the feeler gauge. There is a you tube video on the 0-290, which is the same. Always refer to the lycoming manual.

Good luck 

Craig Gearhart


On Jun 30, 2020, at 12:09 PM, Harley Dixon <harley@...> wrote:


What's the accepted way to adjust the valve lash?  Lycoming instructions say to set the cylinder at TDC, then check or adjust the rocker arm/push rod gap (solid lifters...it's an O-235 C) but wouldn't it be easier to rotate the prop until the intake valve is approaching fully open then set the exhaust valve rocker arm gap, and vice versa for the exhaust valve settings? That's the way I used to do it for my cars before hydraulic lifters. Looking around the internet, I don't see any mention of doing it this way on solid lifter aircraft engines.

Harley
Long EZ N28EZ

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Valve/Rocker arm setting

longezn911gg
 

Harley,
You want to pre-load #2 and #4 then start with #1 at TDC set it to .008” +/-.001 then continue in the firing order. After you have completed it go around once more re-checking with the feeler gauge. There is a you tube video on the 0-290, which is the same. Always refer to the lycoming manual.

Good luck 

Craig Gearhart


On Jun 30, 2020, at 12:09 PM, Harley Dixon <harley@...> wrote:


What's the accepted way to adjust the valve lash?  Lycoming instructions say to set the cylinder at TDC, then check or adjust the rocker arm/push rod gap (solid lifters...it's an O-235 C) but wouldn't it be easier to rotate the prop until the intake valve is approaching fully open then set the exhaust valve rocker arm gap, and vice versa for the exhaust valve settings? That's the way I used to do it for my cars before hydraulic lifters. Looking around the internet, I don't see any mention of doing it this way on solid lifter aircraft engines.

Harley
Long EZ N28EZ

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Valve/Rocker arm setting

Harley Dixon
 

What's the accepted way to adjust the valve lash?  Lycoming instructions say to set the cylinder at TDC, then check or adjust the rocker arm/push rod gap (solid lifters...it's an O-235 C) but wouldn't it be easier to rotate the prop until the intake valve is approaching fully open then set the exhaust valve rocker arm gap, and vice versa for the exhaust valve settings? That's the way I used to do it for my cars before hydraulic lifters. Looking around the internet, I don't see any mention of doing it this way on solid lifter aircraft engines.

Harley
Long EZ N28EZ

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Aging Pilots - another problem

Marc
 

Possibly.  I have no way of knowing.  I just know that he was very helpful.  Sorry I didn’t catch his last name.

 

Marc

 

From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of Terrence Bartley
Sent: Sunday, June 28, 2020 6:07 PM
To: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
Subject: Re: [c-a] Aging Pilots - another problem

 

Marc:

 

Could Walter have been Walter Grantz?  60’s, maybe 70 yrs old at the time.  Walter was a Long EZ builder who lived in Maryland and Boston, MA  Later Virginia Beach, VA.  He was a famous immersed tunnel engineer involved with the Harbor Tunnel in Baltimore, the Boston tunnel (until he quit in frustration with the politicians), and the tunnel under the Bosporus in Istanbul, Turkey.  He has passed, but he was a very special and fine gentleman.  Plus a superb engineer.  I don’t know any other Walter’s with a Long EZ.

 

Terry

 

Terrence E. Bartley

2012 Teakwood Ln

Port Orange, FL 32128

443-463-6465

 

Long EZ N425KT

New Smyrna Beach Airport

EVB

New Smyrna Beach, FL

 

 

 

From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of Marc via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 24, 2020 12:57 PM
To: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
Subject: Re: [c-a] Aging Pilots - another problem

 

Hi Sid,

 

Oh, Darn.  There goes my Oldest LongEZ pilot accolade.

 

I am really impressed with two flights across the pond.

Now that I am in AZ, there is essentially no need for an instrument rating.  I just fly Private Pilot, and I fly alone – no passenger liability, no hull insurance, just liability against crashing into a school building or such.

 

COVID-19 has sort of grounded me for the last five months, and now I am pushed into my annual conditional inspection with hardly any hours on the airframe.

.

Hull insurance would not have helped me much in my two rebuilds – one after my famous crash at Oshkosh in 1988 (http://marc-borom.com/CrshColm.htm, http://marc-borom.com/Crash%20and%20Success%20history%20in%20pictures.pdf) , and after being T-boned at 1000 ft. AGL right after being cleared to land.  Hope not to repeat either event anytime soon.  Neither was a black mark against my record, but exciting, at the least.

 

For my bird, it is now 35 years since first flight.

 

Marc

 

From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sid Tolchin
Sent: Tuesday, June 23, 2020 2:45 PM
To: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
Cc: borommarc@...
Subject: [c-a] Aging Pilots - another problem

 

Hi, Marc.

Very timely thread.

I just turned 88 in May, retired Navy, and have been flying my LongEZ since 1987 after a 5-year build.

It has been flown across the pond twice and Ed Esteb, my partner, and I have enjoyed every minute in it or working on it.

Ed is 92 now and stopped flying in 2010.  I have been flying it regularly with an average of 80 to 100 hours a year.

It is specially equipped with a lot of avionics since it has also been used as a testbed for Trio Avionics autopilots with whom I have been associated from its date of inception in 2000.

After parting with my 35-year-owned T210, N94203, in 2009, the LongEZ was the beneficiary, with a redo including a 160 HP Lyc O-320 D1A, a complete panel and electrical upgrade and a new paint design in 2011.

It has been a joy flying all over the US and Canada with my wife, Penny, other family members and friends and it has stimulated several of these to get their own private pilot licenses.

Since our kids, grandkids and great grandkids are all over the country, it has been really convenient.

I hold a private pilot, instrument rating and rarely fly in any real weather or at night any more.

I have a current third class medical, current biennial flight review and was instrument current as of April of this year, awaiting a new IPC after Covid-19 ends.

I flew to and participated in the AOPA Aging Pilots Program at University of North Dakota several years ago and do my fair share of FAAST, Aviation Safety, AOPA , mZeroA, etc., continuing education participation on line.

Although, in over 60 years of flying in the US, Canada, Mexico, Ireland and Australia, I have had several emergencies, I have never had an incident or accident.

I've been with a single private insurance broker, LL Johns, LLC, since the 70's.

For personal reasons I must have liability insurance to fly and I am not able to self insure. I stopped hull coverage several years ago at the suggestion of my broker.

March of this year I received a certified mail from my current carrier, Starr Aviation, that my liability coverage would not be renewed.

My broker has tried all of the commercial aviation insurance carriers in the US, except for Avemco that is private, and has informed me that none would insure me because of my age and flying an experimental aircraft.  I really don't know if they would insure were I still flying the 210 or any other certified aircraft. Other brokers, including that sponsored by AOPA, have also turned down my applications since they all use the same carriers. 

I am awaiting completion of my IPC before applying to Avemco.  My buddy, Jerry, is with them and he’s over 80.

I am reminded of Bob Hoover, RIP,  but his problems were with the FAA and not insurance carriers, although he did have a problem in Australia flying an airshow because he couldn't get liability insurance at less than 2 million dollars.

So, it appears that no availability of liability insurance will now spell the end of my flying days in my beloved LongEZ.

I am left with the alternative of flying right seat only with my many friends and instructors in other aircraft but not in my pride and joy, N12ET, with no full controls or rudder/brakes in the rear seat area.

I'm sure there are many pilots on this site that are in similar circumstances and would like to hear their stories.

But now I must decide whether to sell this plane, part it out or donate it to a museum. 

I donated my VariEZE N24RW, built by Roman Wazilewski, a very fine craftsman, in the early 70's, to the San Diego Air and Space Museum years ago and that turned out to be a disaster with its rotting away at the Gillespie Field Annex, outside in the elements and uncared for, so I'm super cautious about donating this jewel to anyone.

Although I considered it, I haven’t joined UFO because of my own activity restraints and since most of their meetings are not fly-ins, at least locally.

Sorry for the downer communication but would appreciate yours and anybody’s thoughts on the subject.

Sid Tolchin, LongEZ N12ET

 

Image removed by sender.

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Throttle Quadrant

Greg Gullikson
 

Hello,

I’m in the process of planning and then installation of throttle quadrants in my Long-EZ. I want to use the boomerang shaped levers shown on Marc’s site. I sure would appreciate it if someone in the group could post or send me some photos of similar installation. Any tips/recommendations would be welcome. 

Thanks,
Greg Gullikson 

 

 


Re: ipad overheat again!

Phil Kriley
 

Just got back from a trip to Niagara Falls and home field was buzzing. Two planes doing IFR practice approaches to 8, two planes doing touch and goes on 26 and one other plane plus me trying to land. It is not usually that busy. But my Garmin 375 showed me MOST of the planes (not sure why not ALL) and displayed on my iPad made it fairly easy to find them. Mark I eyeballs found everybody, but the Foreflight display made searching a lot easier.

Back to overheating...I left my iPad in the plane and did not put on the plane’s cover, so when we were ready to come home the iPad would not boot because it was too hot. So we took off and kept the eyeball vent pointed at it until the temp dropped enough after a few minutes for it to turn on. No biggie, but lesson learned. No problems in flight.

Phil Kriley

On Jun 29, 2020, at 10:19 AM, David A Froble <davef@...> wrote:

On 6/29/2020 9:59 AM, Wayne Hicks via groups.io wrote:
-- Are there any ‘airmen’ left??
-- I'm afraid no one is looking for other traffic.

I offer a different opinion. Nothing chills me to the bone more than
"traffic at your 12 o clock, opposite direction, same altitude." It is
comforting to use my Garmin screens and Foreflight to help me pick up
the traffic visually way before the ATC call. Paper, pencil, and
wristwatch is of no use.

As for airmanship, yeah, I can fly with just paper, pencil, and
wristwatch. But I choose not to. Flying with charts and navlogs
requires heads-down time, too. More than you might think. My eyes are
outside the plane more now than ever.
I'm definitely on the side of the fence that advocates all the help that can be had. I'm also of the mind that eyes belong outside the cockpit.

So how do the two get reconciled. My opinion (we all have one) is that the "help" should not require your eyes, but rather your ears. (Don't know how to address anyone who cannot hear.) Warnings should be verbal, along with appropriate advice, if applicable.

Not saying all ADS-B operates in that manner ....

--
David Froble Tel: 724-529-0450
Dave Froble Enterprises, Inc. E-Mail: davef@...
DFE Ultralights, Inc.
170 Grimplin Road
Vanderbilt, PA 15486



Re: ipad overheat again!

David A Froble
 

On 6/29/2020 9:59 AM, Wayne Hicks via groups.io wrote:
-- Are there any ‘airmen’ left??
-- I'm afraid no one is looking for other traffic.

I offer a different opinion. Nothing chills me to the bone more than
"traffic at your 12 o clock, opposite direction, same altitude." It is
comforting to use my Garmin screens and Foreflight to help me pick up
the traffic visually way before the ATC call. Paper, pencil, and
wristwatch is of no use.

As for airmanship, yeah, I can fly with just paper, pencil, and
wristwatch. But I choose not to. Flying with charts and navlogs
requires heads-down time, too. More than you might think. My eyes are
outside the plane more now than ever.
I'm definitely on the side of the fence that advocates all the help that can be had. I'm also of the mind that eyes belong outside the cockpit.

So how do the two get reconciled. My opinion (we all have one) is that the "help" should not require your eyes, but rather your ears. (Don't know how to address anyone who cannot hear.) Warnings should be verbal, along with appropriate advice, if applicable.

Not saying all ADS-B operates in that manner ....

--
David Froble Tel: 724-529-0450
Dave Froble Enterprises, Inc. E-Mail: davef@...
DFE Ultralights, Inc.
170 Grimplin Road
Vanderbilt, PA 15486


Re: ipad overheat again!

Wayne Hicks
 

-- Are there any ‘airmen’ left??
-- I'm afraid no one is looking for other traffic.

I offer a different opinion. Nothing chills me to the bone more than "traffic at your 12 o clock, opposite direction, same altitude."  It is comforting to use my Garmin screens and Foreflight to help me pick up the traffic visually way before the ATC call.  Paper, pencil, and wristwatch is of no use.

As for airmanship, yeah, I can fly with just paper, pencil, and wristwatch.  But I choose not to.  Flying with charts and navlogs requires heads-down time, too.  More than you might think.  My eyes are outside the plane more now than ever.

....Wayne Hicks, Cozy Plans #678
  


Re: Ammeter guidance

gilbert_drieux
 

Any ampmeter, but Compliant w your existing shunt ..... (or change it too...).



Gilbert-Pierre DRIEUX

                 (_
|-------==(_)==--------|  VE  #1736.
             o/ | \o               F-PMPZ @ LFPK.

Such is life und es wird immer sucher.



De : canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> de la part de aviationeyes <skyeyecorp@...>
Envoyé : dimanche 28 juin 2020 22:59
À : canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io>; COZY Builders <cozy_builders@...>
Objet : Re: [c-a] Ammeter guidance
 

If I had to replace a discrete ammeter or voltmeter, I would look into one of the digital units on eBay for just a few bucks. Just mount it on a round plate to use your round hole.
--Jose

On Sun, Jun 28, 2020, at 4:08 PM, Neil Clayton wrote:
> I’m gonna declare my ammeter (an old Van’s steam gauge) well and truely dead.
>
> I can’t afford a digital EMS yet, so I’m just gonna replace it with a
> cheap Aircraft Spruce analogue ammeter.
>
> I see there are 4 to choose from (I don’t wanna spend hundreds, and I
> want one with the center-zero)).
>
> VDO 2-1/4” $73.00
> 30 AMP 2-1/4” no-name $73.00
> Michell 2-1/4” 60 Amp $69.00
> Micro-1000 2-1/4” $73.00
> (Not Westach)
>
> Anyone got opinions on these?
> “Don’t touch it with a barge pole" is good input.
>
> Thanks
> Neil
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Attachments:
> * smime.p7s

--

  skyeyecorp@...




Re: Aging Pilots - another problem

Terrence Bartley
 

Marc:

 

Could Walter have been Walter Grantz?  60’s, maybe 70 yrs old at the time.  Walter was a Long EZ builder who lived in Maryland and Boston, MA  Later Virginia Beach, VA.  He was a famous immersed tunnel engineer involved with the Harbor Tunnel in Baltimore, the Boston tunnel (until he quit in frustration with the politicians), and the tunnel under the Bosporus in Istanbul, Turkey.  He has passed, but he was a very special and fine gentleman.  Plus a superb engineer.  I don’t know any other Walter’s with a Long EZ.

 

Terry

 

Terrence E. Bartley

2012 Teakwood Ln

Port Orange, FL 32128

443-463-6465

 

Long EZ N425KT

New Smyrna Beach Airport

EVB

New Smyrna Beach, FL

 

 

 

From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of Marc via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 24, 2020 12:57 PM
To: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
Subject: Re: [c-a] Aging Pilots - another problem

 

Hi Sid,

 

Oh, Darn.  There goes my Oldest LongEZ pilot accolade.

 

I am really impressed with two flights across the pond.

Now that I am in AZ, there is essentially no need for an instrument rating.  I just fly Private Pilot, and I fly alone – no passenger liability, no hull insurance, just liability against crashing into a school building or such.

 

COVID-19 has sort of grounded me for the last five months, and now I am pushed into my annual conditional inspection with hardly any hours on the airframe.

.

Hull insurance would not have helped me much in my two rebuilds – one after my famous crash at Oshkosh in 1988 (http://marc-borom.com/CrshColm.htm, http://marc-borom.com/Crash%20and%20Success%20history%20in%20pictures.pdf) , and after being T-boned at 1000 ft. AGL right after being cleared to land.  Hope not to repeat either event anytime soon.  Neither was a black mark against my record, but exciting, at the least.

 

For my bird, it is now 35 years since first flight.

 

Marc

 

From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sid Tolchin
Sent: Tuesday, June 23, 2020 2:45 PM
To: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
Cc: borommarc@...
Subject: [c-a] Aging Pilots - another problem

 

Hi, Marc.

Very timely thread.

I just turned 88 in May, retired Navy, and have been flying my LongEZ since 1987 after a 5-year build.

It has been flown across the pond twice and Ed Esteb, my partner, and I have enjoyed every minute in it or working on it.

Ed is 92 now and stopped flying in 2010.  I have been flying it regularly with an average of 80 to 100 hours a year.

It is specially equipped with a lot of avionics since it has also been used as a testbed for Trio Avionics autopilots with whom I have been associated from its date of inception in 2000.

After parting with my 35-year-owned T210, N94203, in 2009, the LongEZ was the beneficiary, with a redo including a 160 HP Lyc O-320 D1A, a complete panel and electrical upgrade and a new paint design in 2011.

It has been a joy flying all over the US and Canada with my wife, Penny, other family members and friends and it has stimulated several of these to get their own private pilot licenses.

Since our kids, grandkids and great grandkids are all over the country, it has been really convenient.

I hold a private pilot, instrument rating and rarely fly in any real weather or at night any more.

I have a current third class medical, current biennial flight review and was instrument current as of April of this year, awaiting a new IPC after Covid-19 ends.

I flew to and participated in the AOPA Aging Pilots Program at University of North Dakota several years ago and do my fair share of FAAST, Aviation Safety, AOPA , mZeroA, etc., continuing education participation on line.

Although, in over 60 years of flying in the US, Canada, Mexico, Ireland and Australia, I have had several emergencies, I have never had an incident or accident.

I've been with a single private insurance broker, LL Johns, LLC, since the 70's.

For personal reasons I must have liability insurance to fly and I am not able to self insure. I stopped hull coverage several years ago at the suggestion of my broker.

March of this year I received a certified mail from my current carrier, Starr Aviation, that my liability coverage would not be renewed.

My broker has tried all of the commercial aviation insurance carriers in the US, except for Avemco that is private, and has informed me that none would insure me because of my age and flying an experimental aircraft.  I really don't know if they would insure were I still flying the 210 or any other certified aircraft. Other brokers, including that sponsored by AOPA, have also turned down my applications since they all use the same carriers. 

I am awaiting completion of my IPC before applying to Avemco.  My buddy, Jerry, is with them and he’s over 80.

I am reminded of Bob Hoover, RIP,  but his problems were with the FAA and not insurance carriers, although he did have a problem in Australia flying an airshow because he couldn't get liability insurance at less than 2 million dollars.

So, it appears that no availability of liability insurance will now spell the end of my flying days in my beloved LongEZ.

I am left with the alternative of flying right seat only with my many friends and instructors in other aircraft but not in my pride and joy, N12ET, with no full controls or rudder/brakes in the rear seat area.

I'm sure there are many pilots on this site that are in similar circumstances and would like to hear their stories.

But now I must decide whether to sell this plane, part it out or donate it to a museum. 

I donated my VariEZE N24RW, built by Roman Wazilewski, a very fine craftsman, in the early 70's, to the San Diego Air and Space Museum years ago and that turned out to be a disaster with its rotting away at the Gillespie Field Annex, outside in the elements and uncared for, so I'm super cautious about donating this jewel to anyone.

Although I considered it, I haven’t joined UFO because of my own activity restraints and since most of their meetings are not fly-ins, at least locally.

Sorry for the downer communication but would appreciate yours and anybody’s thoughts on the subject.

Sid Tolchin, LongEZ N12ET

 

Image removed by sender.

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Ammeter guidance

Tim Andres
 

You may consider just using a volt meter instead. There are advantages to having both,  but the volt meter really tells you all you really need to know. 
Tim Andres

On Jun 28, 2020, at 5:05 PM, William Martin via groups.io <willmeetu8@...> wrote:


Like this!
<IMG_1684.jpeg>






On Sunday, June 28, 2020, 4:00 PM, aviationeyes <skyeyecorp@...> wrote:


If I had to replace a discrete ammeter or voltmeter, I would look into one of the digital units on eBay for just a few bucks. Just mount it on a round plate to use your round hole.
--Jose

On Sun, Jun 28, 2020, at 4:08 PM, Neil Clayton wrote:
> I’m gonna declare my ammeter (an old Van’s steam gauge) well and truely dead.
>
> I can’t afford a digital EMS yet, so I’m just gonna replace it with a
> cheap Aircraft Spruce analogue ammeter.
>
> I see there are 4 to choose from (I don’t wanna spend hundreds, and I
> want one with the center-zero)).
>
> VDO 2-1/4” $73.00
> 30 AMP 2-1/4” no-name $73.00
> Michell 2-1/4” 60 Amp $69.00
> Micro-1000 2-1/4” $73.00
> (Not Westach)
>
> Anyone got opinions on these?
> “Don’t touch it with a barge pole" is good input.
>
> Thanks
> Neil
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Attachments:
> * smime.p7s

--

  skyeyecorp@...


<IMG_1684.jpeg>


Re: COZY: Static Error on altitude

Tony Rothwell
 

The GPS satellites are scattered around the sky in the horizontal plane so you get lots of position lines, good geometry and accurate horizontal fixes BUT all the satellites in view are above the horizon by say 10 degrees thus only 160 deg of the vertical plane and less accurate positioning vertically.
Add to which the basic vertical datum for GPS is the center of the earth not mean sea level.



On Mon, 29 Jun 2020 at 04:21, Tom Brusehaver <cozytom@...> wrote:
Non WAAS GPS will have pretty good attitude differences.

The angle is so shallow, VDOP can be up to a mile (5000ft).  Even something as good as 500ft horizontal it bad vertical.



On Sun, Jun 28, 2020, 12:54 PM Keith Spreuer <kspreuer@...> wrote:
Been noticing that GPS altitude is always above baro altitude. Obviously that depends on the correct baro setting and I don't have WASS GPS.  But I wonder if the 4 kt position error I have is part of this. Guess I need to do some math.

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Re: Ammeter guidance

William Martin
 

Like this!
Inline image






On Sunday, June 28, 2020, 4:00 PM, aviationeyes <skyeyecorp@...> wrote:


If I had to replace a discrete ammeter or voltmeter, I would look into one of the digital units on eBay for just a few bucks. Just mount it on a round plate to use your round hole.
--Jose

On Sun, Jun 28, 2020, at 4:08 PM, Neil Clayton wrote:
> I’m gonna declare my ammeter (an old Van’s steam gauge) well and truely dead.
>
> I can’t afford a digital EMS yet, so I’m just gonna replace it with a
> cheap Aircraft Spruce analogue ammeter.
>
> I see there are 4 to choose from (I don’t wanna spend hundreds, and I
> want one with the center-zero)).
>
> VDO 2-1/4” $73.00
> 30 AMP 2-1/4” no-name $73.00
> Michell 2-1/4” 60 Amp $69.00
> Micro-1000 2-1/4” $73.00
> (Not Westach)
>
> Anyone got opinions on these?
> “Don’t touch it with a barge pole" is good input.
>
> Thanks
> Neil
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Attachments:
> * smime.p7s

--

  skyeyecorp@...



Re: Looking for blue cushions

Ryszard Zadow
 

RAFE has some .

RutanAFE@...

On Jun 28, 2020, at 15:26, Joe Dubner via groups.io <jdubner=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I'm looking for a set of the original blue VariEze or Long-EZ cushions from many years back. Anyone?

Thanks. Reply via email.

--
Joe
Independence, OR



Re: Transponder

Aziz Musa
 

Thank you to those who answered my transponder question.
Aziz


On Jun 27, 2020, at 10:31 PM, Todd Stock via groups.io <tmstock@...> wrote:


Back when the ADS-B rule was being debated, there were proposals to sunset the transponder rule and further encourage GA equipage, but with the follow-on to TCAS 2 decades away from full fielding, relief from the transponder rule is not really something likely to occur in the foreseeable future. I’d also like to see some recognition of the changes in GA transponder design which make the 24 month check a bit of a relic, but not holding my breath.

On Jun 27, 2020, at 22:39, Marc J. Zeitlin <marc.j.zeitlin@...> wrote:


Aziz Musa wrote:
 
Does replacing a transponder with same make and model have any effect on ads-b operation or registration. I am talking about a legacy transponder with the Echo Uat ads-b.

No, but you WILL have to get a new 91.413 Transponder check done to be legal.

--
Marc J. Zeitlin                      marc_zeitlin@...
                                            http://www.cozybuilders.org/
Copyright © 2020                     Burnside Aerospace


Re: Ammeter guidance

aviationeyes
 

If I had to replace a discrete ammeter or voltmeter, I would look into one of the digital units on eBay for just a few bucks. Just mount it on a round plate to use your round hole.
--Jose

On Sun, Jun 28, 2020, at 4:08 PM, Neil Clayton wrote:
I’m gonna declare my ammeter (an old Van’s steam gauge) well and truely dead.

I can’t afford a digital EMS yet, so I’m just gonna replace it with a
cheap Aircraft Spruce analogue ammeter.

I see there are 4 to choose from (I don’t wanna spend hundreds, and I
want one with the center-zero)).

VDO 2-1/4” $73.00
30 AMP 2-1/4” no-name $73.00
Michell 2-1/4” 60 Amp $69.00
Micro-1000 2-1/4” $73.00
(Not Westach)

Anyone got opinions on these?
“Don’t touch it with a barge pole" is good input.

Thanks
Neil






Attachments:
* smime.p7s
--

skyeyecorp@...


Looking for blue cushions

Joe Dubner
 

I'm looking for a set of the original blue VariEze or Long-EZ cushions from many years back. Anyone?

Thanks. Reply via email.

--
Joe
Independence, OR