Date   

Re: Facet Pump Failures

Greg Norman
 

He said, "there was no need to shut it off". Always wondered the pros and cons with that. Always on...redundant/good. Always on...?


On Jun 13, 2014, at 9:33 PM, "PC uh1cw2@... [canard-aviators]" <canard-aviators-noreply@...> wrote:

 

The only Facet pumps that had a history of failing were pumps manufactured prior to 1978. They had an external Diode on the case. If you are purchasing the Facet pumps from an aircraft supplier and not an auto parts store you should not be experiencing failures. The manufacture runs approximately 500 pumps at any given time. The pumps are tested under all viscosity and temperature conditions to run between 10000 and 20000 hours each. They are removed from the bench and examined after a timed life cycle. I was told by an engineer at Facet that the aviation Facet pump should run at least 20000 hours. He said there was no need to ever shut it off. This was about 10 years ago.

 

Phil Camarda

 

From: canard-aviators@... [mailto:canard-aviators@...]
Sent: Friday, June 13, 2014 8:29 PM
To: Canard Mailing List Mailing List Aviators
Subject: [c-a] Facet Pump Failures

 

 

Has anyone else experienced failures of these pumps? The symptom is that they buzz but don’t pump. I use one to prime the engine and as backup for the engine driven pump. The last time it happened I was able to start the engine without priming. Once there was fuel flow the pump started working but on a subsequent start attempt it again refused to pump. This is the third Facet pump in a little over 1,000 hours- same symptom on the previous pumps. The pump is down stream of the tank in line filters and in the rear passenger area. Any thoughts?

 

Bob Foster

N662BF

0320E2D

running avgas only 

 

Sent from Windows Mail

 


Electric pitch trim spring system

DB
 

Anyone familiar with this trim spring system. Who made it? Anyone have one to sell?


Re: COZY: Restarting Stopped Props

Dave Adams
 

I always set the throttle to idle to allow the engine to cool more slowly before pulling the mixture.  With my 9.7:1 piston, O-235, 64" x 74" Lightspeed prop Long, I have to get down around 70 MPH indicated or less for the prop to stop.  There is quite a bit of vibration as the prop slows to a stop. 

Before re-starting the engine, it's fun to "soar" around for a while and enjoy the lack of engine vibration.  To get it rotating again, I have to see around 135 to 140 MPH indicated.  

As stated in the CPs, to minimize altitude loss for a restart, it's best to dive quickly to 140 or more (for my plane). 

Dave Adams
Long EZ N83DT
Race 83

On Jun 30, 2014, at 5:30 PM, "Henry Hallam henry@... [canard-aviators]" <canard-aviators-noreply@...> wrote:

 

My Vari has a standard compression O-200 (believe it is 7:1) that, on
the only day when it stopped in flight, was wearing a Great American
prop that was pitched more toward the climb/fine end of the scale.

My instructor and I had attempted a loop but were too meek with the
entry speed and pull. It became clear we weren't going to make it
round, so he pushed forward to abort. Negative G -> no fuel to the
engine, low airspeed -> stopped prop.
I put it into a pretty steep dive and at around 160 mph indicated and
4000 ft AGL, it restarted.

I imagine a coarser-pitched prop and higher-compression pistons would
need a higher speed to get it windmilling again. If you're
comfortable with your energy management skills, maybe worth an
experiment high overhead a long runway?

Henry

On Mon, Jun 30, 2014 at 2:51 PM, 'Saro Marcarian' via COZY Builders
Mailing List <cozy_builders@...> wrote:
> I have a VariEze with a 9.5:1 O200 and a Prince PTip compromise prop. Oh,
> and no starter.
>
> I'm wondering who out there has a comparable configuration and what you'd
> care to share about what speed the engine / prop stop and restart spinning.


Re: COZY: Restarting Stopped Props

Henry Hallam
 

My Vari has a standard compression O-200 (believe it is 7:1) that, on
the only day when it stopped in flight, was wearing a Great American
prop that was pitched more toward the climb/fine end of the scale.

My instructor and I had attempted a loop but were too meek with the
entry speed and pull. It became clear we weren't going to make it
round, so he pushed forward to abort. Negative G -> no fuel to the
engine, low airspeed -> stopped prop.
I put it into a pretty steep dive and at around 160 mph indicated and
4000 ft AGL, it restarted.

I imagine a coarser-pitched prop and higher-compression pistons would
need a higher speed to get it windmilling again. If you're
comfortable with your energy management skills, maybe worth an
experiment high overhead a long runway?

Henry

On Mon, Jun 30, 2014 at 2:51 PM, 'Saro Marcarian' via COZY Builders
Mailing List <cozy_builders@...> wrote:
I have a VariEze with a 9.5:1 O200 and a Prince PTip compromise prop. Oh,
and no starter.

I'm wondering who out there has a comparable configuration and what you'd
care to share about what speed the engine / prop stop and restart spinning.


Restarting Stopped Props

Saro Marcarian
 

I have a VariEze with a 9.5:1 O200 and a Prince PTip compromise prop.  Oh, and no starter.

I'm wondering who out there has a comparable configuration and what you'd care to share about what speed the engine / prop stop and restart spinning.


Re: How does one make good brackets?

Joel Ventura
 

In the gotchas department, important considerations are the direction
of the grain in the material being bent, and the bend radius if the
bracket is bent up from flat stock. I know I have seen bracket
fabrication in standard aircraft construction publications, possibly
AC 43-13b. 13b is downloadable and computer searchable.

Grain and radius considerations are also summarized here:
http://www.engineersedge.com/sheet_metal.htm

Off the top of my head, other considerations:
1. aluminum is lighter for the same strength but has a finite fatigue life.
2. steel will take higher temperatures (which should not be an issue
for you) and has a theoretical infinite fatigue life if the stresses
are kept below a critical level.
3. Knowing the material specs, the load on the bracket, and the torque
on the bend will allow you to calculate the required thickness of the
material for a given safety factor.

I have had aluminum brackets fail when bolted directly to an engine in
a high vibration environment, so my preference is steel for that kind
of environment. --Joel




On 6/30/14, Izzy Briggs inbriggs@... [canard-aviators]
<canard-aviators-noreply@...> wrote:
Does anyone know of any references that can show some "best practices" for
designing and making one's own bracket in an engine to hold things in
place?
* What's better, steel or aluminum? Yea, it depends....depends on what?

* Is there a reason to make a notch in one place, or some sort of fold in
another?
* How thick does the metal need to be?
* Where should I place the support holes?
* Any gotchas?
I'm putting the Firewall together and would like to make a number of small
brackets to hold various things in place (Fuel flow sensor, wire harness,
carb heat muff, heat shield, baffling, baffling braces etc) and I find
myself making things up as I go along and wondering if my bracket is a good
one or not.

Izzy


Re: [Probable Spam] [c-a] Canard-calendar - July

Keith Spreuer <keith@...>
 

Wow I made the calendar, didn't expect that :-)

Keith


On 6/30/2014 7:56 AM, 'Erlend Moen' erlend@... [canard-aviators] wrote:
 

The July canard desktop calendar is ready for download.

 

 

As always: Thanks a lot for the many beautiful pictures I have received so far. I’m still looking for new pictures, if you have pictures to share, please send them over to me. I need as large resolution as possible. My bandwidth is no problem, so don’t be afraid to send over large images!

 

Safe flying (and building)!

 

Here is the link: http://cozy.ljosnes.no/calendar.html

 

--

Erlend Moen

Cozy #1556 – chapter 13



--


Re: [Probable Spam] [c-a] CANARDS WEST

Keith Spreuer <keith@...>
 

Hear Hear Thanks Tim and company. We can't tell you how much your work is appreciated. It all is taken for granted too often because we are too busy enjoying the results. BUT THANK YOU!

KEITH


On 6/29/2014 9:29 PM, gbisogno@... [canard-aviators] wrote:
 

Big kudos to Tim Fisher and his lovely wife for a great event, fine dinner and terrific tribute to Dead Stick!

Thank you to Don for keeping an eye on things and all the years of keeping our West Coast event alive. 

It says a lot when some folks who can't launch due to weather actually drive 12+ hours to attend!  Jim Price and a couple others did that a few years ago.  This year and an old salt and his nephew builder drove all the way down from Tacoma.

Beautiful Berkuts this year.  Burrall does some smoking work!!  Fantastic source for all things canard.  

Beagle had an excellent talk on navigation outside the GPS world.  Puts you back in touch with charts and all the data they make available.   Thanks to him.

Good seminar on formation flying.   Not something I'm interested in but was good to see how it's done and how well it's organized among the pros.

Looking forward  to next year and,  hopefully.....Arlington in a few days!!!!!



--


Re: How does one make good brackets?

PC <uh1cw2@...>
 

Very Tough question Izzy. As you may get many different answers. I can tell you that whenever I want to benchmark a design or a concept I go on line a do an image search on what I want to do. Example; “ Gascolator Bracket”. I will then look at all the installations I can find and determine what I want to use for material and where I want to mount it to include fittings and accessibility.  If you are really in need for some great examples just pull the Berkut 13 site up. James was kind enough to post his entire build with hundreds if not thousands of pictures.

 

If you get in a bind and do not have the fabrication skills to make something unique for your application, contact me and I’ll most likely just machine it up for you for the cost of shipping.

 

Phil Camarda

 

From: canard-aviators@... [mailto:canard-aviators@...] On Behalf Of Izzy Briggs inbriggs@... [canard-aviators]
Sent: Monday, June 30, 2014 1:09 PM
To: Canard Aviators Mailing List
Subject: [c-a] How does one make good brackets?

 

 

Does anyone know of any references that can show some "best practices" for designing and making one's own bracket in an engine to hold things in place?

  • What's better, steel or aluminum? Yea, it depends....depends on what?
  • Is there a reason to make a notch in one place, or some sort of fold in another?
  • How thick does the metal need to be? 
  • Where should I place the support holes?
  • Any gotchas? 

I'm putting the Firewall together and would like to make a number of small brackets to hold various things in place (Fuel flow sensor, wire harness, carb heat muff, heat shield, baffling, baffling braces etc) and I find myself making things up as I go along and wondering if my bracket is a good one or not. 

 

Izzy

 

 

 


How does one make good brackets?

Izzy
 

Does anyone know of any references that can show some "best practices" for designing and making one's own bracket in an engine to hold things in place?
  • What's better, steel or aluminum? Yea, it depends....depends on what?
  • Is there a reason to make a notch in one place, or some sort of fold in another?
  • How thick does the metal need to be? 
  • Where should I place the support holes?
  • Any gotchas? 
I'm putting the Firewall together and would like to make a number of small brackets to hold various things in place (Fuel flow sensor, wire harness, carb heat muff, heat shield, baffling, baffling braces etc) and I find myself making things up as I go along and wondering if my bracket is a good one or not. 

Izzy

 


Re: CANARDS WEST

gbisogno@...
 


Re: COZY: Cozy Girrrls 6th Annual Early Birds Spaghetti Dinner

cozygirrrl
 

Sorry, there seems to be some confusion over the definition of "Little Red Truck"
 
it looks like this except it now has a box on the back:
 
 
...Chrissi


Re: COZY: Cozy Girrrls 6th Annual Early Birds Spaghetti Dinner

cozygirrrl
 

Reminder please...
response format on one line by itself, other comments on another line, thanks!
 
QTY, NAME, EMAIL, CELL
 
1, Chrissi CanardBuilder, Cozygirrrl@..., 314-374-5620
 
 
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: cozygirrrl via COZY Builders Mailing List
To: cozy_builders ; canard-aviators ; forum
Sent: Mon, Jun 30, 2014 7:36 am
Subject: COZY: Cozy Girrrls 6th Annual Early Birds Spaghetti Dinner

Cozy Girrrls 6th Annual Early Birds Spaghetti Dinner
 
Its that time again!
If you are coming to Osh and are going to be there early in the week and hoping to connect with other Canardians, this is where and when to do it:
  
Location will be at our campsite on North Doolittle providing we get our usual spot
otherwise we will put out the word via grapevine where we will be located,
as always look for the little red truck (hopefully, it is a work in process).
 
Tuesday July 29th, social hour begins around 5PM beverages available BYOBeer
 
$10 "donation" per person
 =Please, no animals!=
 
Picnic tables are never guaranteed so bring a chair if you are able to scrounge one.
 
You will need your chair and maybe a blanket for the movie next door, schedule says
Star Trek Into Darkness (2013)
Tuesday, July 29
2030 - 2200 (8:30 PM - 10:00 PM) or stick around and socialize!
 
Our trusty band of well trained and highly skilled volunteers look forward to seeing you all there!
 
PLEASE, if you are coming to the dinner send us an RSVP with a one line response:
 
# of people, Names, email & cell
Please do it like this:
 
2, Chrissi TheCook, Randi TheChatterBoss, CozyGirrrl@..., 555-867-5309
 
(this is a test)
 
That way there will be enough food and beverage, you wouldn't want to run out would you?


Canard-calendar - July

Erlend Moen <erlend@...>
 

The July canard desktop calendar is ready for download.

 

 

As always: Thanks a lot for the many beautiful pictures I have received so far. I’m still looking for new pictures, if you have pictures to share, please send them over to me. I need as large resolution as possible. My bandwidth is no problem, so don’t be afraid to send over large images!

 

Safe flying (and building)!

 

Here is the link: http://cozy.ljosnes.no/calendar.html

 

--

Erlend Moen

Cozy #1556 – chapter 13


Re: COZY: Airflow Performance Emergency Landing

Bruce Hughes
 

Marc says:
<you DO end up with the pump/filter warmer

Let me piggy back on what Marc describes.

To piggyback on Al:


Does the gascolator also become hot while flying?
Think about it.


We lost the only doctor in a small town when I was
in high school. He and I were enthusiastic
beginners. He had the bucks to buy a Globe Swift.
Went to San Antonio to pick up a potential partner.
It was early June. On the ground 5-10 minutes. On
takeoff the engine quit at 30' above the runway, off
the end of the runway. Well lots of things can cause
engines to quit. I always thought he cut off the
fuel valve when he parked it, then forgot to turn it
back on. There is some gas in the carburetor and
would flow, even with the fuel valve cut off.


Bruce Hughes


Re: COZY: Airflow Performance Emergency Landing

Al Wick <alwick@...>
 

Marc says:
 
Let me piggy back on what Marc describes. Just because it illustrates how easy it is to permanently improve flight safety.
 
I’ve always been enamored with how ignorant I am. This leads me to test and measure things. I needed to be real thorough with fuel delivery as that’s our highest risk item historically.
 
Bottom line, I discovered that my system appeared pretty low risk of vapor lock.....unless..... If I flew for 1 hour or more (heat soaked components in engine compartment), landed and parked for 5 minutes, then restart engine. I would hear that distinctive fuel pump rattle, rough running engine. Vapor lock. Worse on hot day, high altitude airport. Marginal design. Only partial vapor lock, it occurred for only 5 seconds or so. If I parked the plane longer or shorter period, it didn’t occur. Keep in mind that rattling is very destructive to pumps.
 
So what’s happening? My fuel pump was installed low in engine compartment with around 6 inches of fuel line in that same area. Parking heat soaked plane allowed engine heat to transfer to “cool” pump and fuel line. This was enough to cause vapor at pump inlet.
 
Solution? Wow, there are so many. Is it really that painful to tape an oven thermometer to the fuel pump? Measure it’s temp after a few taxi tests. Watch it climb after shut down. Then install a thin little aluminum shield between pump and exhaust? Remeasure temps to verify I really did affect pump temp. I’m just trying to encourage heat to move to other objects. Of course, insulating that 6” of fuel line exposed to heat is a no brainer. Nice permanent safety benefit.
 
Over the years, as I researched fuel delivery failure patterns, I realized that no one was flying with the modern low risk fuel designs. Both airplanes and lawnmowers are trapped in old high risk designs. So I converted my plane to design that in theory drives all the fuel risks to near zero. Ironically, when I flight test it, I assume it will fail. Always a risk of design oversights.
 
-Al Wick
Cozy IV powered by Subaru 3.0R with variable valve lift and cam timing.
Artificial intelligence in cockpit, N9032U 240+ hours from Portland, Oregon
Glass panel design, Subaru install, Prop construct, Risk assessment info:
http://www.ez.org/pages/alwick/index.html
 
 
Sent: Sunday, June 29, 2014 8:14 PM
Subject: [c-a] Re: COZY: Airflow Performance Emergency Landing
 


Todd Carrico wrote:

Any worries with the pump and filter on the hot side of the firewall?
 
Well, as Tim A. pointed out, sometimes it gets pretty crowded there. I've seen a number of planes with both the filter and pump on the hot side, and as long as you keep them down low, near the NACA scoop opening, they're in cold air and there shouldn't be an issue (as long as you have the normal updraft cooling). But you DO end up with the pump/filter warmer than it otherwise would have been, and more exposed and susceptible to damage, at least somewhat.
 
So, no major worries, but unless there's some really good reason not to put them on the cold side, I'd say at least that _I_ prefer them there.
 
--
Marc J. Zeitlin                       mailto:marc_zeitlin@...
                                              http://www.cozybuilders.org/
Copyright (c) 2014                    http://www.mdzeitlin.com/Marc/


Cozy Girrrls 6th Annual Early Birds Spaghetti Dinner

cozygirrrl
 

Cozy Girrrls 6th Annual Early Birds Spaghetti Dinner
 
Its that time again!
If you are coming to Osh and are going to be there early in the week and hoping to connect with other Canardians, this is where and when to do it:
  
Location will be at our campsite on North Doolittle providing we get our usual spot
otherwise we will put out the word via grapevine where we will be located,
as always look for the little red truck (hopefully, it is a work in process).
 
Tuesday July 29th, social hour begins around 5PM beverages available BYOBeer
 
$10 "donation" per person
 =Please, no animals!=
 
Picnic tables are never guaranteed so bring a chair if you are able to scrounge one.
 
You will need your chair and maybe a blanket for the movie next door, schedule says
Star Trek Into Darkness (2013)
Tuesday, July 29
2030 - 2200 (8:30 PM - 10:00 PM) or stick around and socialize!
 
Our trusty band of well trained and highly skilled volunteers look forward to seeing you all there!
 
PLEASE, if you are coming to the dinner send us an RSVP with a one line response:
 
# of people, Names, email & cell
Please do it like this:
 
2, Chrissi TheCook, Randi TheChatterBoss, CozyGirrrl@..., 555-867-5309
 
(this is a test)
 
That way there will be enough food and beverage, you wouldn't want to run out would you?


CANARDS WEST

gbisogno@...
 

Big kudos to Tim Fisher and his lovely wife for a great event, fine dinner and terrific tribute to Dead Stick!

Thank you to Don for keeping an eye on things and all the years of keeping our West Coast event alive. 

It says a lot when some folks who can't launch due to weather actually drive 12+ hours to attend!  Jim Price and a couple others did that a few years ago.  This year and an old salt and his nephew builder drove all the way down from Tacoma.

Beautiful Berkuts this year.  Burrall does some smoking work!!  Fantastic source for all things canard.  

Beagle had an excellent talk on navigation outside the GPS world.  Puts you back in touch with charts and all the data they make available.   Thanks to him.

Good seminar on formation flying.   Not something I'm interested in but was good to see how it's done and how well it's organized among the pros.

Looking forward  to next year and,  hopefully.....Arlington in a few days!!!!!


Starter and other comments

Bruce Hughes
 

Like Don and many others, I have a B&C starter and
the Odyessey battery.


There are other considerations. For grounding the starter,
I have a #1 AWG copper wire from the area on the case
that the starter attaches to. This wire goes to a #1
copper wire attached to a lug near the fire wall (note
that I did NOT say ON the firewall?). That lug has
a #1 cable directly to the ground lug on the battery.
The case also is attached to the same ground lug by a
short copper web attached to the lug and to a bolt on #4
cylinder.


The 12 V (well it drops lower than that) goes from a
solid state unit that I believe is far superior to
the old "starter contactor". The 12 V comes directly
from the battery, not through the master solenoid
because I am suspicious that the master solenoid
would be a serious source of resistance. Don't know;
just my guess.


Bruce Hughes


Starter and other comments

Bruce Hughes
 

Like Don and many others, I have a B&C starter and
the Odyessey battery.


There are other considerations. For grounding the
starter, I have a #1 AWG copper wire from the area
on the case that the starter attaches to. This wire
goes to a #1 copper wire attached to a lug near the
fire wall (note that I did NOT say ON the firewall?).
That lug goes by #1 cable directly to the ground lug
on the battery.


The case also is attached to the same ground lug by a
short copper web attached to the lug and to a bolt on #4
cylinder.


The 12 V (well it drops lower than that) goes from a
solid state unit that I believe is far superior to
the old "starter contactor". I am referring to the
STARTER RELAY (SOLENOID) listed in ASSC catalog for
$9.75 The solid state unit costs more than that.


The 12 V comes directly from the battery, not through
the master solenoid because I am suspicious that the
master solenoid would be a serious source of resistance.
Don't know; just my guess.


Bruce Hughes

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