Topics

Aging Pilots - another problem

Sid Tolchin
 

Hi, Marc.

Very timely thread.

I just turned 88 in May, retired Navy, and have been flying my LongEZ since 1987 after a 5-year build.

It has been flown across the pond twice and Ed Esteb, my partner, and I have enjoyed every minute in it or working on it.

Ed is 92 now and stopped flying in 2010.  I have been flying it regularly with an average of 80 to 100 hours a year.

It is specially equipped with a lot of avionics since it has also been used as a testbed for Trio Avionics autopilots with whom I have been associated from its date of inception in 2000.

After parting with my 35-year-owned T210, N94203, in 2009, the LongEZ was the beneficiary, with a redo including a 160 HP Lyc O-320 D1A, a complete panel and electrical upgrade and a new paint design in 2011.

It has been a joy flying all over the US and Canada with my wife, Penny, other family members and friends and it has stimulated several of these to get their own private pilot licenses.

Since our kids, grandkids and great grandkids are all over the country, it has been really convenient.

I hold a private pilot, instrument rating and rarely fly in any real weather or at night any more.

I have a current third class medical, current biennial flight review and was instrument current as of April of this year, awaiting a new IPC after Covid-19 ends.

I flew to and participated in the AOPA Aging Pilots Program at University of North Dakota several years ago and do my fair share of FAAST, Aviation Safety, AOPA , mZeroA, etc., continuing education participation on line.

Although, in over 60 years of flying in the US, Canada, Mexico, Ireland and Australia, I have had several emergencies, I have never had an incident or accident.

I've been with a single private insurance broker, LL Johns, LLC, since the 70's.

For personal reasons I must have liability insurance to fly and I am not able to self insure. I stopped hull coverage several years ago at the suggestion of my broker.

March of this year I received a certified mail from my current carrier, Starr Aviation, that my liability coverage would not be renewed.

My broker has tried all of the commercial aviation insurance carriers in the US, except for Avemco that is private, and has informed me that none would insure me because of my age and flying an experimental aircraft.  I really don't know if they would insure were I still flying the 210 or any other certified aircraft. Other brokers, including that sponsored by AOPA, have also turned down my applications since they all use the same carriers. 

I am awaiting completion of my IPC before applying to Avemco.  My buddy, Jerry, is with them and he’s over 80.

I am reminded of Bob Hoover, RIP,  but his problems were with the FAA and not insurance carriers, although he did have a problem in Australia flying an airshow because he couldn't get liability insurance at less than 2 million dollars.

So, it appears that no availability of liability insurance will now spell the end of my flying days in my beloved LongEZ.

I am left with the alternative of flying right seat only with my many friends and instructors in other aircraft but not in my pride and joy, N12ET, with no full controls or rudder/brakes in the rear seat area.

I'm sure there are many pilots on this site that are in similar circumstances and would like to hear their stories.

But now I must decide whether to sell this plane, part it out or donate it to a museum. 

I donated my VariEZE N24RW, built by Roman Wazilewski, a very fine craftsman, in the early 70's, to the San Diego Air and Space Museum years ago and that turned out to be a disaster with its rotting away at the Gillespie Field Annex, outside in the elements and uncared for, so I'm super cautious about donating this jewel to anyone.

Although I considered it, I haven’t joined UFO because of my own activity restraints and since most of their meetings are not fly-ins, at least locally.

Sorry for the downer communication but would appreciate yours and anybody’s thoughts on the subject.

Sid Tolchin, LongEZ N12ET

Curt Boyll
 

I examined your VariEze on Gillespie Field in 2016 when I was there to buy an O-360. It is terrible that they do not take care of it.

Google Earth now shows that they have moved it out from under the trees near the entrance, and it sits closer to the runway. So it is more exposed to the elements than ever.

Curt Boyll
VariEze, Cozy … Colorado

On Jun 23, 2020, at 3:45 PM, Sid Tolchin <tolchinair@...> wrote:

Hi, Marc.
Very timely thread.
I just turned 88 in May, retired Navy, and have been flying my LongEZ since 1987 after a 5-year build.
It has been flown across the pond twice and Ed Esteb, my partner, and I have enjoyed every minute in it or working on it.
Ed is 92 now and stopped flying in 2010.  I have been flying it regularly with an average of 80 to 100 hours a year.
It is specially equipped with a lot of avionics since it has also been used as a testbed for Trio Avionics autopilots with whom I have been associated from its date of inception in 2000.
After parting with my 35-year-owned T210, N94203, in 2009, the LongEZ was the beneficiary, with a redo including a 160 HP Lyc O-320 D1A, a complete panel and electrical upgrade and a new paint design in 2011.
It has been a joy flying all over the US and Canada with my wife, Penny, other family members and friends and it has stimulated several of these to get their own private pilot licenses.
Since our kids, grandkids and great grandkids are all over the country, it has been really convenient.
I hold a private pilot, instrument rating and rarely fly in any real weather or at night any more.
I have a current third class medical, current biennial flight review and was instrument current as of April of this year, awaiting a new IPC after Covid-19 ends.
I flew to and participated in the AOPA Aging Pilots Program at University of North Dakota several years ago and do my fair share of FAAST, Aviation Safety, AOPA , mZeroA, etc., continuing education participation on line.
Although, in over 60 years of flying in the US, Canada, Mexico, Ireland and Australia, I have had several emergencies, I have never had an incident or accident.
I've been with a single private insurance broker, LL Johns, LLC, since the 70's.
For personal reasons I must have liability insurance to fly and I am not able to self insure. I stopped hull coverage several years ago at the suggestion of my broker.
March of this year I received a certified mail from my current carrier, Starr Aviation, that my liability coverage would not be renewed.
My broker has tried all of the commercial aviation insurance carriers in the US, except for Avemco that is private, and has informed me that none would insure me because of my age and flying an experimental aircraft.  I really don't know if they would insure were I still flying the 210 or any other certified aircraft. Other brokers, including that sponsored by AOPA, have also turned down my applications since they all use the same carriers.  
I am awaiting completion of my IPC before applying to Avemco.  My buddy, Jerry, is with them and he’s over 80.
I am reminded of Bob Hoover, RIP,  but his problems were with the FAA and not insurance carriers, although he did have a problem in Australia flying an airshow because he couldn't get liability insurance at less than 2 million dollars.
So, it appears that no availability of liability insurance will now spell the end of my flying days in my beloved LongEZ.
I am left with the alternative of flying right seat only with my many friends and instructors in other aircraft but not in my pride and joy, N12ET, with no full controls or rudder/brakes in the rear seat area.
I'm sure there are many pilots on this site that are in similar circumstances and would like to hear their stories.
But now I must decide whether to sell this plane, part it out or donate it to a museum.  
I donated my VariEZE N24RW, built by Roman Wazilewski, a very fine craftsman, in the early 70's, to the San Diego Air and Space Museum years ago and that turned out to be a disaster with its rotting away at the Gillespie Field Annex, outside in the elements and uncared for, so I'm super cautious about donating this jewel to anyone.
Although I considered it, I haven’t joined UFO because of my own activity restraints and since most of their meetings are not fly-ins, at least locally.
Sorry for the downer communication but would appreciate yours and anybody’s thoughts on the subject.
Sid Tolchin, LongEZ N12ET

David A Froble
 

On 6/23/2020 5:45 PM, Sid Tolchin wrote:
Hi, Marc.

Very timely thread.

I just turned 88 in May, retired Navy, and have been flying my LongEZ
since 1987 after a 5-year build.
Sounds good to me.

It has been flown across the pond twice and Ed Esteb, my partner, and I
have enjoyed every minute in it or working on it.

Ed is 92 now and stopped flying in 2010. I have been flying it
regularly with an average of 80 to 100 hours a year.

It is specially equipped with a lot of avionics since it has also been
used as a testbed for Trio Avionics autopilots with whom I have been
associated from its date of inception in 2000.

After parting with my 35-year-owned T210, N94203, in 2009, the LongEZ
was the beneficiary, with a redo including a 160 HP Lyc O-320 D1A, a
complete panel and electrical upgrade and a new paint design in 2011.

It has been a joy flying all over the US and Canada with my wife, Penny,
other family members and friends and it has stimulated several of these
to get their own private pilot licenses.

Since our kids, grandkids and great grandkids are all over the country,
it has been really convenient.

I hold a private pilot, instrument rating and rarely fly in any real
weather or at night any more.

I have a current third class medical, current biennial flight review and
was instrument current as of April of this year, awaiting a new IPC
after Covid-19 ends.

I flew to and participated in the AOPA Aging Pilots Program at
University of North Dakota several years ago and do my fair share of
FAAST, Aviation Safety, AOPA , mZeroA, etc., continuing education
participation on line.

Although, in over 60 years of flying in the US, Canada, Mexico, Ireland
and Australia, I have had several emergencies, I have never had an
incident or accident.

I've been with a single private insurance broker, LL Johns, LLC, since
the 70's.

For personal reasons I must have liability insurance to fly and I am not
able to self insure. I stopped hull coverage several years ago at the
suggestion of my broker.
I cannot believe that whatever reasons cannot be resolved ....

March of this year I received a certified mail from my current carrier,
Starr Aviation, that my liability coverage would not be renewed.

My broker has tried all of the commercial aviation insurance carriers in
the US, except for Avemco that is private, and has informed me that none
would insure me because of my age and flying an experimental aircraft.
I really don't know if they would insure were I still flying the 210 or
any other certified aircraft. Other brokers, including that sponsored by
AOPA, have also turned down my applications since they all use the same
carriers.

I am awaiting completion of my IPC before applying to Avemco. My buddy,
Jerry, is with them and he’s over 80.

I am reminded of Bob Hoover, RIP, but his problems were with the FAA
and not insurance carriers, although he did have a problem in Australia
flying an airshow because he couldn't get liability insurance at less
than 2 million dollars.

So, it appears that no availability of liability insurance will now
spell the end of my flying days in my beloved LongEZ.
Don't let it happen!

Ok, not all of us are the same, but, without flying, I'm not sure I'd want to live. I won't let anything stop me.

No reason to buzz downtown everywhere you fly. Be a bit careful, and tell the insurance companies to take a hike. Fully loaded you're under 2000 lbs, right? How much damage could the aircraft do in the worst case, and how much more likely is things to happen, if they happen, over unimproved land?

Put the aircraft in a trust, or corp, if you need protection for family. If the worst happens, I doubt you'll worry about being sued. Or anything else.

Some won't agree with me. I don't care. Nothing is guaranteed. Well, not flying is guaranteed to drive me crazy..

I am left with the alternative of flying right seat only with my many
friends and instructors in other aircraft but not in my pride and joy,
N12ET, with no full controls or rudder/brakes in the rear seat area.

I'm sure there are many pilots on this site that are in similar
circumstances and would like to hear their stories.

But now I must decide whether to sell this plane, part it out or donate
it to a museum.
Nobody in the family interested?

Whatever you decide, don't go for parting it out.

If you just have to donate it, think first of me, and then Ryszard and RAFE or whatever he's calling it.

I donated my VariEZE N24RW, built by Roman Wazilewski, a very fine
craftsman, in the early 70's, to the San Diego Air and Space Museum
years ago and that turned out to be a disaster with its rotting away at
the Gillespie Field Annex, outside in the elements and uncared for, so
I'm super cautious about donating this jewel to anyone.

Although I considered it, I haven’t joined UFO because of my own
activity restraints and since most of their meetings are not fly-ins, at
least locally.

Sorry for the downer communication but would appreciate yours and
anybody’s thoughts on the subject.
You asked, happy to reply ...

--
David Froble Tel: 724-529-0450
Dave Froble Enterprises, Inc. E-Mail: davef@...
DFE Ultralights, Inc.
170 Grimplin Road
Vanderbilt, PA 15486

David Fife
 

Thanks Sid for telling your story. Do what ever it takes to stay in the air.

Dave

On Jun 23, 2020, at 5:45 PM, Sid Tolchin <tolchinair@...> wrote:



Hi, Marc.

Very timely thread.

I just turned 88 in May, retired Navy, and have been flying my LongEZ since 1987 after a 5-year build.

It has been flown across the pond twice and Ed Esteb, my partner, and I have enjoyed every minute in it or working on it.

Ed is 92 now and stopped flying in 2010.  I have been flying it regularly with an average of 80 to 100 hours a year.

It is specially equipped with a lot of avionics since it has also been used as a testbed for Trio Avionics autopilots with whom I have been associated from its date of inception in 2000.

After parting with my 35-year-owned T210, N94203, in 2009, the LongEZ was the beneficiary, with a redo including a 160 HP Lyc O-320 D1A, a complete panel and electrical upgrade and a new paint design in 2011.

It has been a joy flying all over the US and Canada with my wife, Penny, other family members and friends and it has stimulated several of these to get their own private pilot licenses.

Since our kids, grandkids and great grandkids are all over the country, it has been really convenient.

I hold a private pilot, instrument rating and rarely fly in any real weather or at night any more.

I have a current third class medical, current biennial flight review and was instrument current as of April of this year, awaiting a new IPC after Covid-19 ends.

I flew to and participated in the AOPA Aging Pilots Program at University of North Dakota several years ago and do my fair share of FAAST, Aviation Safety, AOPA , mZeroA, etc., continuing education participation on line.

Although, in over 60 years of flying in the US, Canada, Mexico, Ireland and Australia, I have had several emergencies, I have never had an incident or accident.

I've been with a single private insurance broker, LL Johns, LLC, since the 70's.

For personal reasons I must have liability insurance to fly and I am not able to self insure. I stopped hull coverage several years ago at the suggestion of my broker.

March of this year I received a certified mail from my current carrier, Starr Aviation, that my liability coverage would not be renewed.

My broker has tried all of the commercial aviation insurance carriers in the US, except for Avemco that is private, and has informed me that none would insure me because of my age and flying an experimental aircraft.  I really don't know if they would insure were I still flying the 210 or any other certified aircraft. Other brokers, including that sponsored by AOPA, have also turned down my applications since they all use the same carriers. 

I am awaiting completion of my IPC before applying to Avemco.  My buddy, Jerry, is with them and he’s over 80.

I am reminded of Bob Hoover, RIP,  but his problems were with the FAA and not insurance carriers, although he did have a problem in Australia flying an airshow because he couldn't get liability insurance at less than 2 million dollars.

So, it appears that no availability of liability insurance will now spell the end of my flying days in my beloved LongEZ.

I am left with the alternative of flying right seat only with my many friends and instructors in other aircraft but not in my pride and joy, N12ET, with no full controls or rudder/brakes in the rear seat area.

I'm sure there are many pilots on this site that are in similar circumstances and would like to hear their stories.

But now I must decide whether to sell this plane, part it out or donate it to a museum. 

I donated my VariEZE N24RW, built by Roman Wazilewski, a very fine craftsman, in the early 70's, to the San Diego Air and Space Museum years ago and that turned out to be a disaster with its rotting away at the Gillespie Field Annex, outside in the elements and uncared for, so I'm super cautious about donating this jewel to anyone.

Although I considered it, I haven’t joined UFO because of my own activity restraints and since most of their meetings are not fly-ins, at least locally.

Sorry for the downer communication but would appreciate yours and anybody’s thoughts on the subject.

Sid Tolchin, LongEZ N12ET

Bob Holliston
 

I know several pilots that have never flown with liability insurance. If I couldn't get it anymore I'd probably still fly but I wouldn't be giving rides anymore (I've given hundreds). I drove with no liability insurance till I was 30 (back in the good old days when it was legal) because of speeding tickets and just couldn't afford it. I've never had an auto accident that was my fault so it worked out. Now I'm down to one speeding ticket every 4-5 years (thank you radar detectors and laser jammers) . 


On Tue, Jun 23, 2020 at 4:44 PM Curt Boyll via groups.io <curtb442=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
I examined your VariEze on Gillespie Field in 2016 when I was there to buy an O-360. It is terrible that they do not take care of it.

Google Earth now shows that they have moved it out from under the trees near the entrance, and it sits closer to the runway. So it is more exposed to the elements than ever.

Curt Boyll
VariEze, Cozy … Colorado

On Jun 23, 2020, at 3:45 PM, Sid Tolchin <tolchinair@...> wrote:

Hi, Marc.
Very timely thread.
I just turned 88 in May, retired Navy, and have been flying my LongEZ since 1987 after a 5-year build.
It has been flown across the pond twice and Ed Esteb, my partner, and I have enjoyed every minute in it or working on it.
Ed is 92 now and stopped flying in 2010.  I have been flying it regularly with an average of 80 to 100 hours a year.
It is specially equipped with a lot of avionics since it has also been used as a testbed for Trio Avionics autopilots with whom I have been associated from its date of inception in 2000.
After parting with my 35-year-owned T210, N94203, in 2009, the LongEZ was the beneficiary, with a redo including a 160 HP Lyc O-320 D1A, a complete panel and electrical upgrade and a new paint design in 2011.
It has been a joy flying all over the US and Canada with my wife, Penny, other family members and friends and it has stimulated several of these to get their own private pilot licenses.
Since our kids, grandkids and great grandkids are all over the country, it has been really convenient.
I hold a private pilot, instrument rating and rarely fly in any real weather or at night any more.
I have a current third class medical, current biennial flight review and was instrument current as of April of this year, awaiting a new IPC after Covid-19 ends.
I flew to and participated in the AOPA Aging Pilots Program at University of North Dakota several years ago and do my fair share of FAAST, Aviation Safety, AOPA , mZeroA, etc., continuing education participation on line.
Although, in over 60 years of flying in the US, Canada, Mexico, Ireland and Australia, I have had several emergencies, I have never had an incident or accident.
I've been with a single private insurance broker, LL Johns, LLC, since the 70's.
For personal reasons I must have liability insurance to fly and I am not able to self insure. I stopped hull coverage several years ago at the suggestion of my broker.
March of this year I received a certified mail from my current carrier, Starr Aviation, that my liability coverage would not be renewed.
My broker has tried all of the commercial aviation insurance carriers in the US, except for Avemco that is private, and has informed me that none would insure me because of my age and flying an experimental aircraft.  I really don't know if they would insure were I still flying the 210 or any other certified aircraft. Other brokers, including that sponsored by AOPA, have also turned down my applications since they all use the same carriers.  
I am awaiting completion of my IPC before applying to Avemco.  My buddy, Jerry, is with them and he’s over 80.
I am reminded of Bob Hoover, RIP,  but his problems were with the FAA and not insurance carriers, although he did have a problem in Australia flying an airshow because he couldn't get liability insurance at less than 2 million dollars.
So, it appears that no availability of liability insurance will now spell the end of my flying days in my beloved LongEZ.
I am left with the alternative of flying right seat only with my many friends and instructors in other aircraft but not in my pride and joy, N12ET, with no full controls or rudder/brakes in the rear seat area.
I'm sure there are many pilots on this site that are in similar circumstances and would like to hear their stories.
But now I must decide whether to sell this plane, part it out or donate it to a museum.  
I donated my VariEZE N24RW, built by Roman Wazilewski, a very fine craftsman, in the early 70's, to the San Diego Air and Space Museum years ago and that turned out to be a disaster with its rotting away at the Gillespie Field Annex, outside in the elements and uncared for, so I'm super cautious about donating this jewel to anyone.
Although I considered it, I haven’t joined UFO because of my own activity restraints and since most of their meetings are not fly-ins, at least locally.
Sorry for the downer communication but would appreciate yours and anybody’s thoughts on the subject.
Sid Tolchin, LongEZ N12ET



--

tfdarden
 

What a great post about your flying career, Sid. I’m a newbie with only 33 years flying experience!

Two comments:

1) fly without liability insurance. Go ahead and give away whatever assets you don’t need, as will happen when you die anyway. This will protect them from legal claims if the worst should happen. But as others have noted, what are the odds of liability anyway, at least if you are flying alone? Most small planes don’t hurt anyone outside the plane. 

2) stop getting medicals, at least if you qualify for the BasicMed system. The only reason you would not qualify would be if you have a special issuance, I believe. And even if so, there is a system for dealing with that. The reason not to keep getting a conventional medical is because if it is ever denied, then you are ineligible for BasicMed (and for the normal Class III or whatever). If you quit getting them when you’re healthy, then you can’t be denied, basically. 

Your story was inspiring. Keep flying. Bless you. 

Tom Darden

Rick Hall
 

On 6/23/2020 3:45 PM, Sid Tolchin wrote:

Never met Penny, as you're back seat was filled with luggage when we met at Springfield-Branson due to WX. Me NE to SW, you SW to NE.  If you don't remember our meeting I sure do, and would have gladly paid for your meal at Wendys if you had allowed me :)
It has been a joy flying all over the US and Canada with my wife, Penny, other family members and friends and it has stimulated several of these to get their own private pilot licenses.

Since our kids, grandkids and great grandkids are all over the country, it has been really convenient
Single here, no real family, liability insurance is not a requirement to preserve my vast estate. But I do carry it so I can fly Young Eagles :) Talk with your financial advisor, perhaps a revocable trust for your home and assets.

If you think parting out is a solution, please stop. Rutan Aircraft Flying Experience would gladly accept accept your donation, and this donation could be beneficial on your tax return.

Rick (flew a rental PA28 aka "the Barf Rocket", N888AW to SGF to meet with Sid)

Marc
 

Hi Sid,

 

Oh, Darn.  There goes my Oldest LongEZ pilot accolade.

 

I am really impressed with two flights across the pond.

Now that I am in AZ, there is essentially no need for an instrument rating.  I just fly Private Pilot, and I fly alone – no passenger liability, no hull insurance, just liability against crashing into a school building or such.

 

COVID-19 has sort of grounded me for the last five months, and now I am pushed into my annual conditional inspection with hardly any hours on the airframe.

.

Hull insurance would not have helped me much in my two rebuilds – one after my famous crash at Oshkosh in 1988 (http://marc-borom.com/CrshColm.htm, http://marc-borom.com/Crash%20and%20Success%20history%20in%20pictures.pdf) , and after being T-boned at 1000 ft. AGL right after being cleared to land.  Hope not to repeat either event anytime soon.  Neither was a black mark against my record, but exciting, at the least.

 

For my bird, it is now 35 years since first flight.

 

Marc

 

From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sid Tolchin
Sent: Tuesday, June 23, 2020 2:45 PM
To: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
Cc: borommarc@...
Subject: [c-a] Aging Pilots - another problem

 

Hi, Marc.

Very timely thread.

I just turned 88 in May, retired Navy, and have been flying my LongEZ since 1987 after a 5-year build.

It has been flown across the pond twice and Ed Esteb, my partner, and I have enjoyed every minute in it or working on it.

Ed is 92 now and stopped flying in 2010.  I have been flying it regularly with an average of 80 to 100 hours a year.

It is specially equipped with a lot of avionics since it has also been used as a testbed for Trio Avionics autopilots with whom I have been associated from its date of inception in 2000.

After parting with my 35-year-owned T210, N94203, in 2009, the LongEZ was the beneficiary, with a redo including a 160 HP Lyc O-320 D1A, a complete panel and electrical upgrade and a new paint design in 2011.

It has been a joy flying all over the US and Canada with my wife, Penny, other family members and friends and it has stimulated several of these to get their own private pilot licenses.

Since our kids, grandkids and great grandkids are all over the country, it has been really convenient.

I hold a private pilot, instrument rating and rarely fly in any real weather or at night any more.

I have a current third class medical, current biennial flight review and was instrument current as of April of this year, awaiting a new IPC after Covid-19 ends.

I flew to and participated in the AOPA Aging Pilots Program at University of North Dakota several years ago and do my fair share of FAAST, Aviation Safety, AOPA , mZeroA, etc., continuing education participation on line.

Although, in over 60 years of flying in the US, Canada, Mexico, Ireland and Australia, I have had several emergencies, I have never had an incident or accident.

I've been with a single private insurance broker, LL Johns, LLC, since the 70's.

For personal reasons I must have liability insurance to fly and I am not able to self insure. I stopped hull coverage several years ago at the suggestion of my broker.

March of this year I received a certified mail from my current carrier, Starr Aviation, that my liability coverage would not be renewed.

My broker has tried all of the commercial aviation insurance carriers in the US, except for Avemco that is private, and has informed me that none would insure me because of my age and flying an experimental aircraft.  I really don't know if they would insure were I still flying the 210 or any other certified aircraft. Other brokers, including that sponsored by AOPA, have also turned down my applications since they all use the same carriers. 

I am awaiting completion of my IPC before applying to Avemco.  My buddy, Jerry, is with them and he’s over 80.

I am reminded of Bob Hoover, RIP,  but his problems were with the FAA and not insurance carriers, although he did have a problem in Australia flying an airshow because he couldn't get liability insurance at less than 2 million dollars.

So, it appears that no availability of liability insurance will now spell the end of my flying days in my beloved LongEZ.

I am left with the alternative of flying right seat only with my many friends and instructors in other aircraft but not in my pride and joy, N12ET, with no full controls or rudder/brakes in the rear seat area.

I'm sure there are many pilots on this site that are in similar circumstances and would like to hear their stories.

But now I must decide whether to sell this plane, part it out or donate it to a museum. 

I donated my VariEZE N24RW, built by Roman Wazilewski, a very fine craftsman, in the early 70's, to the San Diego Air and Space Museum years ago and that turned out to be a disaster with its rotting away at the Gillespie Field Annex, outside in the elements and uncared for, so I'm super cautious about donating this jewel to anyone.

Although I considered it, I haven’t joined UFO because of my own activity restraints and since most of their meetings are not fly-ins, at least locally.

Sorry for the downer communication but would appreciate yours and anybody’s thoughts on the subject.

Sid Tolchin, LongEZ N12ET


Virus-free. www.avg.com

Marc
 

Hi David,

Thanks for the alternative to parting out the prize. I have a granddaughter who is completing her commercial pilot training, but she has shown no interest in acquiring my LongEZ. She is a flyer, not a builder, and it takes a special personality to embrace the full package of pilot-builder-A&P-repairman, etc.

Marc

-----Original Message-----
From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of David A Froble
Sent: Tuesday, June 23, 2020 4:56 PM
To: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
Subject: Re: [c-a] Aging Pilots - another problem

On 6/23/2020 5:45 PM, Sid Tolchin wrote:
Hi, Marc.

Very timely thread.

I just turned 88 in May, retired Navy, and have been flying my LongEZ
since 1987 after a 5-year build.
Sounds good to me.

It has been flown across the pond twice and Ed Esteb, my partner, and
I have enjoyed every minute in it or working on it.

Ed is 92 now and stopped flying in 2010. I have been flying it
regularly with an average of 80 to 100 hours a year.

It is specially equipped with a lot of avionics since it has also been
used as a testbed for Trio Avionics autopilots with whom I have been
associated from its date of inception in 2000.

After parting with my 35-year-owned T210, N94203, in 2009, the LongEZ
was the beneficiary, with a redo including a 160 HP Lyc O-320 D1A, a
complete panel and electrical upgrade and a new paint design in 2011.

It has been a joy flying all over the US and Canada with my wife,
Penny, other family members and friends and it has stimulated several
of these to get their own private pilot licenses.

Since our kids, grandkids and great grandkids are all over the
country, it has been really convenient.

I hold a private pilot, instrument rating and rarely fly in any real
weather or at night any more.

I have a current third class medical, current biennial flight review
and was instrument current as of April of this year, awaiting a new
IPC after Covid-19 ends.

I flew to and participated in the AOPA Aging Pilots Program at
University of North Dakota several years ago and do my fair share of
FAAST, Aviation Safety, AOPA , mZeroA, etc., continuing education
participation on line.

Although, in over 60 years of flying in the US, Canada, Mexico,
Ireland and Australia, I have had several emergencies, I have never
had an incident or accident.

I've been with a single private insurance broker, LL Johns, LLC, since
the 70's.

For personal reasons I must have liability insurance to fly and I am
not able to self insure. I stopped hull coverage several years ago at
the suggestion of my broker.
I cannot believe that whatever reasons cannot be resolved ....

March of this year I received a certified mail from my current
carrier, Starr Aviation, that my liability coverage would not be renewed.

My broker has tried all of the commercial aviation insurance carriers
in the US, except for Avemco that is private, and has informed me that
none would insure me because of my age and flying an experimental aircraft.
I really don't know if they would insure were I still flying the 210
or any other certified aircraft. Other brokers, including that
sponsored by AOPA, have also turned down my applications since they
all use the same carriers.

I am awaiting completion of my IPC before applying to Avemco. My
buddy, Jerry, is with them and he’s over 80.

I am reminded of Bob Hoover, RIP, but his problems were with the FAA
and not insurance carriers, although he did have a problem in
Australia flying an airshow because he couldn't get liability
insurance at less than 2 million dollars.

So, it appears that no availability of liability insurance will now
spell the end of my flying days in my beloved LongEZ.
Don't let it happen!

Ok, not all of us are the same, but, without flying, I'm not sure I'd want to live. I won't let anything stop me.

No reason to buzz downtown everywhere you fly. Be a bit careful, and tell the insurance companies to take a hike. Fully loaded you're under
2000 lbs, right? How much damage could the aircraft do in the worst case, and how much more likely is things to happen, if they happen, over unimproved land?

Put the aircraft in a trust, or corp, if you need protection for family.
If the worst happens, I doubt you'll worry about being sued. Or anything else.

Some won't agree with me. I don't care. Nothing is guaranteed. Well, not flying is guaranteed to drive me crazy..

I am left with the alternative of flying right seat only with my many
friends and instructors in other aircraft but not in my pride and joy,
N12ET, with no full controls or rudder/brakes in the rear seat area.

I'm sure there are many pilots on this site that are in similar
circumstances and would like to hear their stories.

But now I must decide whether to sell this plane, part it out or
donate it to a museum.
Nobody in the family interested?

Whatever you decide, don't go for parting it out.

If you just have to donate it, think first of me, and then Ryszard and RAFE or whatever he's calling it.

I donated my VariEZE N24RW, built by Roman Wazilewski, a very fine
craftsman, in the early 70's, to the San Diego Air and Space Museum
years ago and that turned out to be a disaster with its rotting away
at the Gillespie Field Annex, outside in the elements and uncared for,
so I'm super cautious about donating this jewel to anyone.

Although I considered it, I haven’t joined UFO because of my own
activity restraints and since most of their meetings are not fly-ins,
at least locally.

Sorry for the downer communication but would appreciate yours and
anybody’s thoughts on the subject.
You asked, happy to reply ...

--
David Froble Tel: 724-529-0450
Dave Froble Enterprises, Inc. E-Mail: davef@...
DFE Ultralights, Inc.
170 Grimplin Road
Vanderbilt, PA 15486




--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com

Sid Tolchin
 

Rick Hall,
Certainly I remember! We were both trying to beat the closing in weather on
departure. I've been keeping up on your progress ever since, on this site.

I had been with Young Eagles also in my last T210 but had my concerns with
new (and unknown) kids in the back seat of the EZ so that stopped.

So many responses I've had, on and off this site, thanks to all.

One of the primary reasons for liability insurance is my selfish joy in
carrying passengers and letting them get the "feel" using the rear stick,
never doing any maneuvers or even steep turns until they're comfortable,
stopping at a different airport for lunch and taking photos. The latest was
a young student, newly rated for multiengine commercial, who had never done
single-engine commercial maneuvers such as chandelles, S turns across a
road, 8's, spirals around a point, etc. that he tried to perfect from the
rear seat of the EZ over several flights. His instructor was impressed last
week when he did them so well in their 172 during the first time out for his
SE commercial rating.

I never ask newbies to fly, they have to ask me, and there have been a lot
in these 64 years of flying in all kinds of aircraft.

I appreciate all of the comments about going bare and I'd like to include a
pertinent comment by Mike Yodice at AOPA:
"While working in the capacity of an AOPA Legal Services Plan counselor, I
used to get a lot of calls about the utility of establishing a Limited
Liability Company (LLC) to own an aircraft. I found that many callers seemed
to think that owning an airplane in an LLC provides absolute protection
against all manner of liability. It does not. An LLC offers limited
liability, that is, its members are generally not personally liable for the
debts, obligations and liabilities of the entity itself. However, a member
of an LLC piloting an owned aircraft involved in an accident resulting in a
claim of pilot negligence or similar may be held personally liable. Aircraft
owners should consult with a knowledgeable aviation attorney in their state
to evaluate the best liability protection strategies for their particular
circumstances, which might include using an LLC. A common recommendation
from legal practitioners and insurance professionals alike is to buy as much
liability insurance as you can get or afford."

.... and from a lawyer friend who laughed and said: "Yeah, you might be
protected with an LLC or a family trust and, in the end, you'll probably win
but you'll spend most or all of what you're trying to protect for attorney
fees."

So I'll not let my bride have to deal with all that and just keep on tryin'.

Sid

-----Original Message-----
From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
<canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Hall
Sent: Tuesday, June 23, 2020 8:17 PM
To: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
Subject: Re: [c-a] Aging Pilots - another problem

On 6/23/2020 3:45 PM, Sid Tolchin wrote:

Never met Penny, as you're back seat was filled with luggage when we met at
Springfield-Branson due to WX. Me NE to SW, you SW to NE.  If you don't
remember our meeting I sure do, and would have gladly paid for your meal at
Wendys if you had allowed me :)
It has been a joy flying all over the US and Canada with my wife,
Penny, other family members and friends and it has stimulated several
of these to get their own private pilot licenses.

Since our kids, grandkids and great grandkids are all over the
country, it has been really convenient
Single here, no real family, liability insurance is not a requirement to
preserve my vast estate. But I do carry it so I can fly Young Eagles :) Talk
with your financial advisor, perhaps a revocable trust for your home and
assets.

If you think parting out is a solution, please stop. Rutan Aircraft Flying
Experience would gladly accept accept your donation, and this donation could
be beneficial on your tax return.

Rick (flew a rental PA28 aka "the Barf Rocket", N888AW to SGF to meet with
Sid)

tfdarden
 

Hi, Sid, I am embarrassed to admit that I am an attorney (YLS ‘81). I conceal it when possible, having left the profession after test-driving four law firms either part time during law school or during my summers. I grew up as a mechanic in high school and could not imagine life in a quiet N.Y. office building. Why I went to law school is a longer conversation, but generally, how many college students do you know who have any brains? Well, I didn’t either.   

Your comments about the LLC are correct — it is of limited value if the owner is the pilot, because almost all crashes are “pilot error.” If you’re flying it, you’re probably liable!

Your point about liability from flying passengers is excellent. That IS the big risk for pilots. I perceive that there are waivers that are beneficial, albeit not iron-clad. Might be worth getting one for people who fly lots of others. A good aviation lawyer is Dennis Haber in Miami, and he knows about this. I confess I have not implemented his advice, but I don’t fly many people. 

I’d use an LLC anyway because it might help a little (basically if the error related to plane ownership vs piloting). But it is not like insurance, for sure. 

The best protections are either to have a lot of insurance, which basically no one has with an EAB — one million is a low number if someone gets killed — or alternatively, not to be financially worth suing. I was encouraging you to pursue the second strategy, by giving your assets away early vs via your will, if you have much, or putting them into a trust while you’re alive. I know some plaintiffs’ attorneys, and I am quite certain that you will not be sued (or it will be quickly dropped) if you don’t have significant assets, because they really like money.

By the way, not that I should “out” him here, but David Orr is an attorney, while also being a nice guy!  Maybe he will speak up and offer some insights. If he says something different than I said here, listen to him and not me. 

I am happy to discuss by phone if that would be helpful. 


Terrence Bartley
 

Marc:

 

Could Walter have been Walter Grantz?  60’s, maybe 70 yrs old at the time.  Walter was a Long EZ builder who lived in Maryland and Boston, MA  Later Virginia Beach, VA.  He was a famous immersed tunnel engineer involved with the Harbor Tunnel in Baltimore, the Boston tunnel (until he quit in frustration with the politicians), and the tunnel under the Bosporus in Istanbul, Turkey.  He has passed, but he was a very special and fine gentleman.  Plus a superb engineer.  I don’t know any other Walter’s with a Long EZ.

 

Terry

 

Terrence E. Bartley

2012 Teakwood Ln

Port Orange, FL 32128

443-463-6465

 

Long EZ N425KT

New Smyrna Beach Airport

EVB

New Smyrna Beach, FL

 

 

 

From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of Marc via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 24, 2020 12:57 PM
To: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
Subject: Re: [c-a] Aging Pilots - another problem

 

Hi Sid,

 

Oh, Darn.  There goes my Oldest LongEZ pilot accolade.

 

I am really impressed with two flights across the pond.

Now that I am in AZ, there is essentially no need for an instrument rating.  I just fly Private Pilot, and I fly alone – no passenger liability, no hull insurance, just liability against crashing into a school building or such.

 

COVID-19 has sort of grounded me for the last five months, and now I am pushed into my annual conditional inspection with hardly any hours on the airframe.

.

Hull insurance would not have helped me much in my two rebuilds – one after my famous crash at Oshkosh in 1988 (http://marc-borom.com/CrshColm.htm, http://marc-borom.com/Crash%20and%20Success%20history%20in%20pictures.pdf) , and after being T-boned at 1000 ft. AGL right after being cleared to land.  Hope not to repeat either event anytime soon.  Neither was a black mark against my record, but exciting, at the least.

 

For my bird, it is now 35 years since first flight.

 

Marc

 

From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sid Tolchin
Sent: Tuesday, June 23, 2020 2:45 PM
To: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
Cc: borommarc@...
Subject: [c-a] Aging Pilots - another problem

 

Hi, Marc.

Very timely thread.

I just turned 88 in May, retired Navy, and have been flying my LongEZ since 1987 after a 5-year build.

It has been flown across the pond twice and Ed Esteb, my partner, and I have enjoyed every minute in it or working on it.

Ed is 92 now and stopped flying in 2010.  I have been flying it regularly with an average of 80 to 100 hours a year.

It is specially equipped with a lot of avionics since it has also been used as a testbed for Trio Avionics autopilots with whom I have been associated from its date of inception in 2000.

After parting with my 35-year-owned T210, N94203, in 2009, the LongEZ was the beneficiary, with a redo including a 160 HP Lyc O-320 D1A, a complete panel and electrical upgrade and a new paint design in 2011.

It has been a joy flying all over the US and Canada with my wife, Penny, other family members and friends and it has stimulated several of these to get their own private pilot licenses.

Since our kids, grandkids and great grandkids are all over the country, it has been really convenient.

I hold a private pilot, instrument rating and rarely fly in any real weather or at night any more.

I have a current third class medical, current biennial flight review and was instrument current as of April of this year, awaiting a new IPC after Covid-19 ends.

I flew to and participated in the AOPA Aging Pilots Program at University of North Dakota several years ago and do my fair share of FAAST, Aviation Safety, AOPA , mZeroA, etc., continuing education participation on line.

Although, in over 60 years of flying in the US, Canada, Mexico, Ireland and Australia, I have had several emergencies, I have never had an incident or accident.

I've been with a single private insurance broker, LL Johns, LLC, since the 70's.

For personal reasons I must have liability insurance to fly and I am not able to self insure. I stopped hull coverage several years ago at the suggestion of my broker.

March of this year I received a certified mail from my current carrier, Starr Aviation, that my liability coverage would not be renewed.

My broker has tried all of the commercial aviation insurance carriers in the US, except for Avemco that is private, and has informed me that none would insure me because of my age and flying an experimental aircraft.  I really don't know if they would insure were I still flying the 210 or any other certified aircraft. Other brokers, including that sponsored by AOPA, have also turned down my applications since they all use the same carriers. 

I am awaiting completion of my IPC before applying to Avemco.  My buddy, Jerry, is with them and he’s over 80.

I am reminded of Bob Hoover, RIP,  but his problems were with the FAA and not insurance carriers, although he did have a problem in Australia flying an airshow because he couldn't get liability insurance at less than 2 million dollars.

So, it appears that no availability of liability insurance will now spell the end of my flying days in my beloved LongEZ.

I am left with the alternative of flying right seat only with my many friends and instructors in other aircraft but not in my pride and joy, N12ET, with no full controls or rudder/brakes in the rear seat area.

I'm sure there are many pilots on this site that are in similar circumstances and would like to hear their stories.

But now I must decide whether to sell this plane, part it out or donate it to a museum. 

I donated my VariEZE N24RW, built by Roman Wazilewski, a very fine craftsman, in the early 70's, to the San Diego Air and Space Museum years ago and that turned out to be a disaster with its rotting away at the Gillespie Field Annex, outside in the elements and uncared for, so I'm super cautious about donating this jewel to anyone.

Although I considered it, I haven’t joined UFO because of my own activity restraints and since most of their meetings are not fly-ins, at least locally.

Sorry for the downer communication but would appreciate yours and anybody’s thoughts on the subject.

Sid Tolchin, LongEZ N12ET

 

Image removed by sender.

Virus-free. www.avg.com

Marc
 

Possibly.  I have no way of knowing.  I just know that he was very helpful.  Sorry I didn’t catch his last name.

 

Marc

 

From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of Terrence Bartley
Sent: Sunday, June 28, 2020 6:07 PM
To: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
Subject: Re: [c-a] Aging Pilots - another problem

 

Marc:

 

Could Walter have been Walter Grantz?  60’s, maybe 70 yrs old at the time.  Walter was a Long EZ builder who lived in Maryland and Boston, MA  Later Virginia Beach, VA.  He was a famous immersed tunnel engineer involved with the Harbor Tunnel in Baltimore, the Boston tunnel (until he quit in frustration with the politicians), and the tunnel under the Bosporus in Istanbul, Turkey.  He has passed, but he was a very special and fine gentleman.  Plus a superb engineer.  I don’t know any other Walter’s with a Long EZ.

 

Terry

 

Terrence E. Bartley

2012 Teakwood Ln

Port Orange, FL 32128

443-463-6465

 

Long EZ N425KT

New Smyrna Beach Airport

EVB

New Smyrna Beach, FL

 

 

 

From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of Marc via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 24, 2020 12:57 PM
To: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
Subject: Re: [c-a] Aging Pilots - another problem

 

Hi Sid,

 

Oh, Darn.  There goes my Oldest LongEZ pilot accolade.

 

I am really impressed with two flights across the pond.

Now that I am in AZ, there is essentially no need for an instrument rating.  I just fly Private Pilot, and I fly alone – no passenger liability, no hull insurance, just liability against crashing into a school building or such.

 

COVID-19 has sort of grounded me for the last five months, and now I am pushed into my annual conditional inspection with hardly any hours on the airframe.

.

Hull insurance would not have helped me much in my two rebuilds – one after my famous crash at Oshkosh in 1988 (http://marc-borom.com/CrshColm.htm, http://marc-borom.com/Crash%20and%20Success%20history%20in%20pictures.pdf) , and after being T-boned at 1000 ft. AGL right after being cleared to land.  Hope not to repeat either event anytime soon.  Neither was a black mark against my record, but exciting, at the least.

 

For my bird, it is now 35 years since first flight.

 

Marc

 

From: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io <canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sid Tolchin
Sent: Tuesday, June 23, 2020 2:45 PM
To: canard-aviators@canardzone.groups.io
Cc: borommarc@...
Subject: [c-a] Aging Pilots - another problem

 

Hi, Marc.

Very timely thread.

I just turned 88 in May, retired Navy, and have been flying my LongEZ since 1987 after a 5-year build.

It has been flown across the pond twice and Ed Esteb, my partner, and I have enjoyed every minute in it or working on it.

Ed is 92 now and stopped flying in 2010.  I have been flying it regularly with an average of 80 to 100 hours a year.

It is specially equipped with a lot of avionics since it has also been used as a testbed for Trio Avionics autopilots with whom I have been associated from its date of inception in 2000.

After parting with my 35-year-owned T210, N94203, in 2009, the LongEZ was the beneficiary, with a redo including a 160 HP Lyc O-320 D1A, a complete panel and electrical upgrade and a new paint design in 2011.

It has been a joy flying all over the US and Canada with my wife, Penny, other family members and friends and it has stimulated several of these to get their own private pilot licenses.

Since our kids, grandkids and great grandkids are all over the country, it has been really convenient.

I hold a private pilot, instrument rating and rarely fly in any real weather or at night any more.

I have a current third class medical, current biennial flight review and was instrument current as of April of this year, awaiting a new IPC after Covid-19 ends.

I flew to and participated in the AOPA Aging Pilots Program at University of North Dakota several years ago and do my fair share of FAAST, Aviation Safety, AOPA , mZeroA, etc., continuing education participation on line.

Although, in over 60 years of flying in the US, Canada, Mexico, Ireland and Australia, I have had several emergencies, I have never had an incident or accident.

I've been with a single private insurance broker, LL Johns, LLC, since the 70's.

For personal reasons I must have liability insurance to fly and I am not able to self insure. I stopped hull coverage several years ago at the suggestion of my broker.

March of this year I received a certified mail from my current carrier, Starr Aviation, that my liability coverage would not be renewed.

My broker has tried all of the commercial aviation insurance carriers in the US, except for Avemco that is private, and has informed me that none would insure me because of my age and flying an experimental aircraft.  I really don't know if they would insure were I still flying the 210 or any other certified aircraft. Other brokers, including that sponsored by AOPA, have also turned down my applications since they all use the same carriers. 

I am awaiting completion of my IPC before applying to Avemco.  My buddy, Jerry, is with them and he’s over 80.

I am reminded of Bob Hoover, RIP,  but his problems were with the FAA and not insurance carriers, although he did have a problem in Australia flying an airshow because he couldn't get liability insurance at less than 2 million dollars.

So, it appears that no availability of liability insurance will now spell the end of my flying days in my beloved LongEZ.

I am left with the alternative of flying right seat only with my many friends and instructors in other aircraft but not in my pride and joy, N12ET, with no full controls or rudder/brakes in the rear seat area.

I'm sure there are many pilots on this site that are in similar circumstances and would like to hear their stories.

But now I must decide whether to sell this plane, part it out or donate it to a museum. 

I donated my VariEZE N24RW, built by Roman Wazilewski, a very fine craftsman, in the early 70's, to the San Diego Air and Space Museum years ago and that turned out to be a disaster with its rotting away at the Gillespie Field Annex, outside in the elements and uncared for, so I'm super cautious about donating this jewel to anyone.

Although I considered it, I haven’t joined UFO because of my own activity restraints and since most of their meetings are not fly-ins, at least locally.

Sorry for the downer communication but would appreciate yours and anybody’s thoughts on the subject.

Sid Tolchin, LongEZ N12ET

 

Image removed by sender.

Virus-free. www.avg.com