Operation limitations


Glenn Charles
 

Boys,

After 17 years of the rebuild of N600EZ I’m trying to get it into the air.  I don’t want to fly it until I’m legal.  BUT the paperwork is almost harder than the build ! !!!

Does anyone have any idea what the FSDO office means by operational limitations associated with the airworthiness certificate ?  I don’t think I got anything like that when I perchased the bird in 05.

I’ve also somehow let the registration expire but I have re-applied, and sent in the fee but when I call, they say they’re processing applications from January !!!!!  How can I wait several months when flying weather is here !!!

Also, I need a conditional  inspection since I did not build it. Any one near SBM that could help ?  I’m about 35 miles due East of OSH. 

Any help would be awesome. 

Also, does anybody else have super hot cowling ?  I can’t even keep my hand on it after taxi tests.

Using reflective insulation under the cowl helps but I wonder if it restricts airflow .

Glennbob

N600EZ


skovbjerg
 

Glenn or Bob? 
The FSDO who issued the original operating limitations should have a copy on file…. But…
Because so much time have lapsed you might be better of by having a new AW inspection done and get a new set of OLs
Jay

On Jun 22, 2022, at 14:42, Glenn Charles via groups.io <gcm2291@...> wrote:

 Boys,

After 17 years of the rebuild of N600EZ I’m trying to get it into the air.  I don’t want to fly it until I’m legal.  BUT the paperwork is almost harder than the build ! !!!

Does anyone have any idea what the FSDO office means by operational limitations associated with the airworthiness certificate ?  I don’t think I got anything like that when I perchased the bird in 05.

I’ve also somehow let the registration expire but I have re-applied, and sent in the fee but when I call, they say they’re processing applications from January !!!!!  How can I wait several months when flying weather is here !!!

Also, I need a conditional  inspection since I did not build it. Any one near SBM that could help ?  I’m about 35 miles due East of OSH. 

Any help would be awesome. 

Also, does anybody else have super hot cowling ?  I can’t even keep my hand on it after taxi tests.

Using reflective insulation under the cowl helps but I wonder if it restricts airflow .

Glennbob

N600EZ


kent ashton
 

Your Ops limits will be in the FAA’s database for the aircraft. The FSDO may be able to pull them up using your N-number unless the registration expired years ago and was wiped from the records which may very well be the case after 17 years. If the FSDO cannot call up the record by N-number—or any record of N600EZ, then it is likely the records were purged in a periodic records purge

I presume your re-rgistration will go through OK and you have good title to the aircraft. You might speed that up by hiring one of the aircraft title search firms around OK City. It should not cost much more. With your new registration you can apply for new Ops Limits. The current Ops Limits are shown in the FAA’s main website. Those are generally what you would be issued. An inspector/DAR will have to see the airplane but it is usually a quick inspection and probably faster through a DAR. I don’t know if they will touch it until your new registration comes in.

Normally a hot cowl does not hurt the cowl unless it’s exposed to the direct heat of the exhausts. In that case, apply a patch of fiberfrax and reflective tape in that area near the exhausts. Let the airplane cool between taxi tests and keep the CHTs below 425 for sure. A thin la

BTW, it is “condition inspection”, not “conditional”, i.e. in a safe condition for flight.
-Kent

On Jun 22, 2022, at 8:40 AM, Glenn Charles via groups.io <gcm2291@...> wrote:

Boys,

After 17 years of the rebuild of N600EZ I’m trying to get it into the air. I don’t want to fly it until I’m legal. BUT the paperwork is almost harder than the build ! !!!

Does anyone have any idea what the FSDO office means by operational limitations associated with the airworthiness certificate ? I don’t think I got anything like that when I perchased the bird in 05.

I’ve also somehow let the registration expire but I have re-applied, and sent in the fee but when I call, they say they’re processing applications from January !!!!! How can I wait several months when flying weather is here !!!

Also, I need a conditional inspection since I did not build it. Any one near SBM that could help ? I’m about 35 miles due East of OSH.

Any help would be awesome.

Also, does anybody else have super hot cowling ? I can’t even keep my hand on it after taxi tests.

Using reflective insulation under the cowl helps but I wonder if it restricts airflow .

Glennbob

N600EZ




Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad


Todd Carrico
 

On Jun 22, 2022, at 8:32 AM, kent ashton <kjashton@...> wrote:

Your Ops limits will be in the FAA’s database for the aircraft. The FSDO may be able to pull them up using your N-number unless the registration expired years ago and was wiped from the records which may very well be the case after 17 years. If the FSDO cannot call up the record by N-number—or any record of N600EZ, then it is likely the records were purged in a periodic records purge

I presume your re-rgistration will go through OK and you have good title to the aircraft. You might speed that up by hiring one of the aircraft title search firms around OK City. It should not cost much more. With your new registration you can apply for new Ops Limits. The current Ops Limits are shown in the FAA’s main website. Those are generally what you would be issued. An inspector/DAR will have to see the airplane but it is usually a quick inspection and probably faster through a DAR. I don’t know if they will touch it until your new registration comes in.

Normally a hot cowl does not hurt the cowl unless it’s exposed to the direct heat of the exhausts. In that case, apply a patch of fiberfrax and reflective tape in that area near the exhausts. Let the airplane cool between taxi tests and keep the CHTs below 425 for sure. A thin la

BTW, it is “condition inspection”, not “conditional”, i.e. in a safe condition for flight.
-Kent

Fort Worth FSDO told me that my restoration was “normal maintenance”, and didn’t require anything more than what regular maintenance entailed. That being said, We are going to need new op limits because ours are from 1999, and call out kingman AZ for phase I operations…. That might make things more interesting.

Glenn might want new op limits even if it is just to move his test area.

Tc





On Jun 22, 2022, at 8:40 AM, Glenn Charles via groups.io <gcm2291@...> wrote:

Boys,

After 17 years of the rebuild of N600EZ I’m trying to get it into the air. I don’t want to fly it until I’m legal. BUT the paperwork is almost harder than the build ! !!!

Does anyone have any idea what the FSDO office means by operational limitations associated with the airworthiness certificate ? I don’t think I got anything like that when I perchased the bird in 05.

I’ve also somehow let the registration expire but I have re-applied, and sent in the fee but when I call, they say they’re processing applications from January !!!!! How can I wait several months when flying weather is here !!!

Also, I need a conditional inspection since I did not build it. Any one near SBM that could help ? I’m about 35 miles due East of OSH.

Any help would be awesome.

Also, does anybody else have super hot cowling ? I can’t even keep my hand on it after taxi tests.

Using reflective insulation under the cowl helps but I wonder if it restricts airflow .

Glennbob

N600EZ




Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad





Marc J. Zeitlin
 

Todd Carrico wrote:
 
Fort Worth FSDO told me that my restoration was “normal maintenance”, and didn’t require anything more than what regular maintenance entailed.  That being said, We are going to need new op limits because ours are from 1999, and call out kingman AZ for phase I operations…. That might make things more interesting.

Glenn might want new op limits even if it is just to move his test area.

A number of misconceptions here. There is USUALLY only ever ONE Phase I test period (usually 40 hours) on any E-AB aircraft. However, the Operating Limitations will have a paragraph on what the owner needs to do in the case of a Major Change. Early (pre-1990's) OL's invalidated the AWC and required a new inspection of the aircraft, which would then also result in the issuance of new OL's, with the appropriate Phase I test period (usually 5 hours) and a new test flight area.

HOWEVER, for OL's that did NOT invalidate the AWC (which now, is most of them, and certainly almost any since the mid 1990's) the paragraph regarding major changes will state something along the lines of either:
  • contact the local responsible FSDO and tell them what you're going to do, and in what test area, and for how long
  • contact the local responsible FSDO and tell them what you'd LIKE to do, in what test area, and for how long, and get written approval from them
  • If you're very lucky, you don't have to contact anyone, but only put the plane back into a test period, and log the testing in the logbook
NONE of these options put the aircraft back into Phase I. The owner is required to "re-establish compliance with 14 CFR Part 91.319 (b)". This is NOT Phase I, although it's commonly referred to that way. No place in the OL's does the "re-establishment" paragraph call the testing period "Phase I", and there is no requirement to use the original Phase I test area for the compliance period. If you're lucky and only have to log the re-compliance (I'm one of the lucky ones, from 2002) then use some reasonable test area. If you have to work with the local FSDO, ask for a reasonable test area in your letter to them that's local to you.

And if, as Todd states, they don't regard (and YOU don't regard) anything you've done to the plane as a "Major Change", as defined in 14 CFR Part 21.93(a):


then there will be no "re-compliance" test period at all, and no test area. Now, if you've spent 17 years refurbishing a Long-EZ and making changes, even if they're not "Major" changes, it would be smart to HAVE a self defined test area and perform a full "Phase I" compliant test period of 40 hours, even if the FAA doesn't require it and no official documentation is required.

--
Marc J. Zeitlin                      marc_zeitlin@...
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